approve

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English aproven, appreven (to prove), Old French aprover (to approve), (French approuver), from Latin approbō, from ad + probō (to esteem as good, approve, prove). Compare prove, approbate.

Verb[edit]

approve (third-person singular simple present approves, present participle approving, simple past and past participle approved)

  1. (transitive) To sanction officially; to ratify; to confirm.
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
    Although we may disagree with it, we must nevertheless approve the sentence handed down by the court-martial.
  2. (transitive) To regard as good; to commend; to be pleased with; to think well of.
    We approve the measure of the administration, for it is an excellent decision.
  3. (transitive) To make proof of; to demonstrate; to prove or show practically.
  4. (intransitive) To consider or show to be worthy of approbation or acceptance.
    Note: This word, when it signifies to be pleased with, to think favorably (of), is often followed by of.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Old French aprouer; a- + a form apparently derived from the pro, prod, in Latin prōsum (be useful or profitable). Compare with improve.

Verb[edit]

approve (third-person singular simple present approves, present participle approving, simple past and past participle approved)

  1. (transitive, English Law) To make profit of; to convert to one's own profit;—said especially of waste or common land appropriated by the lord of the manor.

References[edit]