tui

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Maori tūī.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

tui (plural tui or tuis)

  1. A species of honeyeater, Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae, a bird which is endemic to New Zealand. [from early 19th c.]
    Synonyms: mockingbird, parson bird (both archaic), poë, poë-bird (both obsolete)
    • 1832, Augustus Earle, A Narrative of a Nine Months’ Residence in New Zealand, in 1827; [], London: [] [A. & R. Spottiswoode] for Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, & Longman, [], OCLC 1003915180, page 174:
      [A]ll was quiet, beautiful, and serene; the only sounds which broke the calm were the wild notes of the tooe (or New Zealand blackbird), the splashing of our own oars, or the occasional flight of a wild duck (or shag), disturbed by our approach.
      The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that this is the earliest occurence of the word in English.
    • 1863, Karl [von] Scherzer, “Auckland”, in Narrative of the Circumnavigation of the Globe by the Austrian Frigate Novara, [], volume III, London: Saunders, Otley, and Co., [], OCLC 5666927, page 159:
      The most frequently visible of these feathered denizens of the forest is the Tui (Prostemadera novæ Zelandiæ), called 'the parson' by Captain [James] Cook, in consequence of its having two white feathers in the lower part of its neck resembling bands. In colour and shape it is very like the kingfisher, and its melodious notes present great variety.
    • 1884, R[obert] McCormick, chapter XVI, in Voyages of Discovery in the Arctic and Antarctic Seas, and Round the World: [], volume II, London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, [], OCLC 1063306020, page 297:
      Mr. Charles Enderby showed us a New Zealand Tui, or parson-bird, in a glass case, which he had kept alive in England for two years.
    • 1921, H[erbert] Guthrie-Smith, “The Future of Native Avifauna”, in Tutira: The Story of a New Zealand Sheep Station, Edinburgh; London: William Blackwood and Sons, OCLC 794042862, page 216:
      The Pigeon (Carpophaga Novæ Zealandiæ) and Tui or Parson Bird (Prosthemadera Novæ Zealandiæ) are certain also to become rare birds. Elsewhere on the run food-supply and breeding accommodation alike will have been swept clear. A few pair of each will nevertheless maintain themselves in the gorges. The Tui will then as now haunt the homestead and shelter-belts when in mid-winter the eucalypts break into flower.
    • a. 1973, Eileen Duggan, “[Appendix: Selected Prose] A Few New Zealand Roads”, in Peter Whiteford, editor, Selected Poems, Wellington: Victoria University Press, published 1994, →ISBN, page 107:
      But it was the Tui Marina end that lingers in the memory. It was haunted by tuis, great insolent Carusos, who would half throw a note and then break off in the middle in sheer delight at their own marvellousness or in sudden greed.
    • 2011, Pat Willmer, “Pollination in Different Habitats”, in Pollination and Floral Ecology, Princeton, N.J.; Woodstock, Oxfordshire: Princeton University Press, →ISBN, part IV (Floral Ecology), page 601, column 2:
      On these two large islands [New Zealand], the native biota lacks many angiosperm and insect groups found routinely elsewhere, and the native flowers (about 80% endemic) are strongly dominated by rather dull white generalist forms, with flies, small moths, and beetles visiting: there are just a few bee- and bird-pollinated examples (visited mainly by bellbirds and tuis), and no native butterfly flowers.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ tui, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1915; “tui, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Daai Chin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water). Cognate to S'gaw Karen ထံ (hṭee).

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Helga So-Hartmann, A descriptive grammar of Daai Chin (2009)

Fijian[edit]

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. king
  2. principal chief

Hrangkhol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water). Cognate to S'gaw Karen ထံ (hṭee).

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. water

References[edit]


Khumi Chin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water). Cognate to S'gaw Karen ထံ (hṭee).

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. water

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tuī

  1. genitive singular of

Adjective[edit]

tuī

  1. masculine nominative plural of tuus
  2. masculine genitive singular of tuus
  3. neuter genitive singular of tuus
  4. masculine vocative plural of tuus

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

tui

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tuī.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of tuí.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tuǐ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tuì.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Min Nan[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of tui – see (“heap; pile; mound; to pile up; to stack up; etc.”).
(This character, tui, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

Mizo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water). Cognate to S'gaw Karen ထံ (hṭee).

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. water
  2. any liquid

Verb[edit]

tui

  1. to flow

Ralte[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water). Cognate to S'gaw Karen ထံ (hṭee).

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. water

Further reading[edit]

  • Kosei Otsuka, A Basic Vocabulary and a Text of the Ralte Language (2016)

Rapa Nui[edit]

Verb[edit]

tui

  1. sew

Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Pronoun[edit]

tui

  1. you (singular)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tui m (plural tuis)

  1. tweet (post of Twitter)

Swahili[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tui (ma class, no plural)

  1. coconut milk
    tui la nazi
    coconut milk

Tahitian[edit]

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. earache
  2. otitis

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. (colloquial, sometimes humorous, especially used among close friends along with ông or ) Central Vietnam and Southern Vietnam form of tôi

Usage notes[edit]

  • Unlike its alternative form tôi, tui is not considered formal and can be seen used regularly by Central and Southern Vietnamese speakers.

Zou[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water). Cognate to S'gaw Karen ထံ (hṭee).

Noun[edit]

tui

  1. water

References[edit]