due

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See also: Due, dûe, , and -dü

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dewe, dew, due, from Old French deü (due), past participle of devoir (to owe), from Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (I owe), from dē- (from) +‎ habeō (I have).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

due (comparative more due, superlative most due)

  1. Owed or owing.
    He is due four weeks of back pay.
    The amount due is just three quid.
    The due bills total nearly seven thousand dollars.
    He can wait for the amount due him.
    Synonyms: needed, owing, to be made, required
  2. Appropriate.
    With all due respect, you're wrong about that.
  3. Scheduled; expected.
    Rain is due this afternoon.
    The train is due in five minutes.
    When is your baby due?
    Synonyms: expected, forecast
  4. Having reached the expected, scheduled, or natural time.
    The baby is just about due.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The huge square box, parquet-floored and high-ceilinged, had been arranged to display a suite of bedroom furniture designed and made in the halcyon days of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, when modish taste was just due to go clean out of fashion for the best part of the next hundred years.
    Synonym: expected
  5. Owing; ascribable, as to a cause.
    The dangerously low water table is due to rapidly growing pumping.
    • 1852, John David Forbes, "Dissertation on the Progress of Mathematical and Physical Science" in Encyclopædia Britannica
      the milky aspect be due to a confusion of small stars
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 2, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[2]:
      Mother [] considered that the exclusiveness of Peter's circle was due not to its distinction, but to the fact that it was an inner Babylon of prodigality and whoredom, from which every Kensingtonian held aloof, except on the conventional tip-and-run excursions in pursuit of shopping, tea and theatres.
  6. On a direct bearing, especially for the four points of the compass
    The town is 5 miles due North of the bridge.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

due (comparative more due, superlative most due)

  1. (used with compass directions) Directly; exactly.
    The river runs due north for about a mile.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

due (plural dues)

  1. Deserved acknowledgment.
    Give him his due — he is a good actor.
    • 2015 January 31, Daniel Taylor, “David Silva seizes point for Manchester City as Chelsea are checked”, in The Guardian (London)[3]:
      Chelsea, to give them their due, did start to cut out the defensive lapses as the game went on but they needed to because their opponents were throwing everything at them in those stages and, if anything, seemed encouraged by the message that Mourinho’s Rémy-Cahill switch sent out.
  2. (in plural dues) A membership fee.
  3. That which is owed; debt; that which belongs or may be claimed as a right; whatever custom, law, or morality requires to be done, duty.
  4. Right; just title or claim.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dúfa, from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ, cognate with Norwegian due, Swedish duva, Dutch duif, German Taube, English dove.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

due c (singular definite duen, plural indefinite duer)

  1. pigeon, dove

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto numbers (edit)
 ←  1 2 3  → 
    Cardinal: du
    Ordinal: dua
    Adverbial: due
    Multiplier: duobla, duopa
    Fractional: duona, duono

Etymology[edit]

From du +‎ -e.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

due

  1. secondly

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

due

  1. feminine singular of the past participle of devoir

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From du (two) +‎ -e.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

due

  1. both
    Synonym: ambe (neologism)

Italian[edit]

Italian cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : due
    Ordinal : secondo
    Multiplier : doppio
    Distributive : doppiamente
    Collective : entrambi
    Fractional : mezzo

Alternative forms[edit]

  • dui (archaic, literary)
  • duo m or f (archaic, literary)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duae, feminine plural of duo, from Proto-Italic *duō, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdu.e/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dù‧e

Numeral[edit]

due (invariable)

  1. two

Noun[edit]

due m (invariable)

  1. two

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Playing cards in Italian · carte da gioco (layout · text)
Ace of spades.svg 2 of spades.svg 3 of spades.svg 4 of spades.svg 5 of spades.svg 6 of spades.svg 7 of spades.svg
asso due tre quattro cinque sei sette
8 of spades.svg 9 of spades.svg 10 of spades.svg Jack of spades2.svg Queen of spades2.svg King of spades2.svg Joker black 02.svg
otto nove dieci fante donna,
regina
re jolly, joker,
matta

Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

due

  1. Alternative form of dewe (due)

Noun[edit]

due

  1. Alternative form of dewe (due)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb
A pigeon.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse dúfa (dove, pigeon), from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ (dove, pigeon), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (hazy, unclear, dark; deep).

Cognate with Danish due, Swedish duva, Icelandic dúfa, Dutch duif, German Taube and English dove.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

due f or m (definite singular dua or duen, indefinite plural duer, definite plural duene)

  1. (zoology) a dove or pigeon; culver (one of several birds of the family Columbidae, which consists of more than 300 species)
    • (Can we date this quote?), The Bible, Matt 10,16:
      vær kloke som slanger og troskyldige som duer
      be wise as serpents and faithful as doves
    • 1949, Johan Borgen, Jenny og påfuglen, page 34:
      enkelte av disse blide duer var tilmed så foretaksomme at de ikke nøyde seg med å legge brev og aviser fra seg på det store bordet i hålen
      some of these cheerful pigeons were even so enterprising that they did not content themselves with leaving letters and newspapers on the big table in the hole
    • 1874, Henrik Ibsen, Peer Gynt, page 161:
      falk og due, due og falk
      falcon and dove, dove and falcon
    leke hauk og due
    play hawk and dove; a game in which one participant tries to catch the other
    1. (humorous, in the plural) a couple that is very much in love
      • 1885, Henrik Ibsen, Brand, page 89:
        hej, øves leg af kælne duer på disse ørkenbrune tuer!
        hey, practice playing with cuddly pigeons on these desert brown tufts!
      Synonym: turteldue
    2. (poetic) a dove (term of endearment for a woman one holds dearly)
      • (Can we date this quote?), The Bible, Song of Songs 5,2:
        lukk opp for mig, min søster, min elskede, min due, min fullkomne
        open up to me, my sister, my beloved, my dove, my perfect
    3. (figuratively) a symbol of peace and reconciliation
      fredens duedove of peace
      Synonym: fredsdue
    4. (Christianity) a symbol of the Holy Spirit
      • (Can we date this quote?), The Bible, Matt 3,16:
        [Jesus] så Guds ånd komme ned over seg som en due
        [Jesus] saw the Spirit of God coming down upon him like a dove
      • 1885, Henrik Ibsen, Brand, page 219:
        Guds klarheds due sidder skjult; ve, aldrig over mig den dalte
        The dove of God's clarity sits hidden; woe, never upon me it fell
  2. (sports) a clay pigeon (a flying target used as moving target in sport shooting)
    Synonym: leirdue

Etymology 2[edit]

From English dove, from Middle English dove, duve, douve (dove, pigeon), from Old English *dūfe (dove, pigeon), from Proto-West Germanic *dūbā (dove, pigeon), from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ (dove, pigeon), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (hazy, unclear, dark; deep).

Noun[edit]

due f or m (definite singular dua or duen, indefinite plural duer, definite plural duene)

  1. (politics) a dove (a person favouring conciliation and negotiation rather than conflict)
    • 1968, Pax, page 11:
      den selvsamme «hauk» som tapte for den republikanske «duen» Hatfield ved senatsvalget
      the very "hawk" who lost to the Republican "dove" Hatfield in the Senate election
    • 1971, Dagbladet, page 12:
      senator Edward M. Kennedy – en av «duene» i amerikansk politikk når det gjelder Vietnam-krigen
      Senator Edward M. Kennedy - one of the "doves" of American politics in the Vietnam War

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From the pronoun du (you), from Old Norse þú (you), from Proto-Germanic *þū (you), from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂ (you).

Verb[edit]

due (passive dues, imperative du, present tense duer, simple past and past participle duet, present participle duende, verbal noun duing)

  1. (colloquial, transitive) to say du (you) to someone
    • 1910, Nini Roll Anker, Per Haukeberg, page 206:
      det var vel rimelig du maatte due en slik kar
      it was probably reasonable you had to say you to such a guy
    Synonyms: dutte, duse

Etymology 4[edit]

Misspelling, or a dialectal form, of duge (to help; be useful), from Old Norse duga (to help, aid; do, suffice), from Proto-Germanic *duganą (to be useful, avail), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰedʰówgʰe (to be productive), from the root *dʰewgʰ- (to produce; be strong, have force).

Verb[edit]

due

  1. Misspelling of duge.

Etymology 5[edit]

From Italian due (two), from Latin duae, feminine plural of duo (two), from Proto-Italic *duō (two), from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁ (two).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

due

  1. Only used in a due (indicating two musicians or sections play together)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dúfa, from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ. Compare Danish due, Swedish duva, Icelandic dúfa, Dutch duif, German Taube, English dove.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

due f (definite singular dua, indefinite plural duer, definite plural duene)

  1. A bird of the family Columbidae, the pigeons and doves.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Common contraction of du (you (sing.)) and e, colloquial pronunciation spelling of är (are).

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Contraction[edit]

due

  1. (nonstandard, text messaging, Internet slang) ur, you're, you are
    due fett fin assåur really good-looking y'know
    ja venne om dueI dunno if ur in