vis

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See also: Vis, vís, viš, víš, -vis, Vis., and вис

English[edit]

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 vis on Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin vis.

Noun[edit]

vis (plural vires)

  1. Force; energy; might; power.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis

  1. Abbreviation of viscount.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Tamil வீசை (vīcai) and/or Telugu వీసె (vīse)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis (plural visses)

  1. Alternative spelling of viss

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch vis, from Middle Dutch visch, from Old Dutch fisc, from Proto-West Germanic *fisk, from Proto-Germanic *fiskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pisḱ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis (plural visse, diminutive vissie)

  1. fish (aquatic organism)
  2. (collective) fish (multiple fish collectively)

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *uitśi-(ā), from Proto-Indo-European *weyḱ- (house, settlement). Cognate to Sanskrit विश् (víś, settlement, community, tribe), Ancient Greek οἰκία (oikía, house), Latin vicus (village).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis m (indefinite plural vise, definite singular visi, definite plural viset)

  1. place
  2. land
  3. country

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. second-person singular imperative of viset

Anagrams[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vādō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. (first-person singular indicative present) of zer

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vís (in ǫðru vís(i) "otherwise"), from Proto-Germanic *wīsō, *wīsǭ (manner). Cognate with Norwegian vis, Swedish vis, English wise, Dutch wijze and German Weise. Another variant of the same word is Danish vise (song), Swedish visa, from Old Norse vísa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis c

  1. manner, way
    Altså må jeg finde æblerne på anden vis.
    In conclusion, I must find the apples some other way.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

vis,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse víss, from Proto-Germanic *wīsaz (wise). Cognates include Norwegian vis, Swedish vis, English wise, and German weise.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vis

  1. wise

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of vis
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular vis visere visest2
Neuter singular vist visere visest2
Plural vise visere visest2
Definite attributive1 vise visere viseste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

References[edit]

vis,3” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse viss, from Proto-Germanic *gawissaz, cognates with Norwegian viss, Swedish viss, German gewiss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vis (neuter vist, plural and definite singular attributive visse)

  1. sure, certain
    den visse død
    certain death
  2. certain, a
    En vis Hr. Broholm vil tale med Dem.
    A mr. Broholm wishes to speak with you.

References[edit]

vis,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. imperative of vise

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vɪs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vis
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch visch, from Old Dutch fisc, from Proto-West Germanic *fisk, from Proto-Germanic *fiskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pisḱ-.

Noun[edit]

vis m (plural vissen, diminutive visje n)

  1. fish (aquatic organism)
  2. (collective) fish (multiple fish collectively)

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: vis

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of vissen
  2. imperative of vissen

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French viz, from Latin vītis (vine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis f (plural vis)

  1. screw (metal fastener)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See vivre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. inflection of vivre:
    1. first/second-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular present imperative

Etymology 3[edit]

See voir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. first/second-person singular past historic of voir

Further reading[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *wīs, from Proto-Indo-European *wéyh₁s (force, vehemence), from *weyh₁- (to rush). Cognate with Ancient Greek ἴς (ís, strength). See also via, invītus, invītō, Ancient Greek οἶμος (oîmos).

Noun[edit]

vīs f (irregular, genitive *vīs); third declension

  1. force, power, strength, vigor, faculty, potency
    • Sit vīs tēcum.
      May the Force be with you.
  2. (in the plural) strength, might (physical)
    omnibus vīribuswith all his strength; with all her might
  3. violence, assault
    ad vim atque ad arma confugereto fly to violence and fighting
  4. (figuratively) meaning, nature, essence, significance
  5. (figuratively) assault, affront
  6. (figuratively) quantity, flood
  7. (New Latin, physics) energy, force
Usage notes[edit]

The plural forms of this noun are often treated as a separate plurale tantum noun. Genitive and dative are replaced with the ones of robur (roboris, robori)

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (irregular, defective).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vīs vīrēs
Genitive *vīs vīrium
Dative *vī vīribus
Accusative vim vīrēs
vīrīs
Ablative vīribus
Vocative vīs vīrēs
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From volō (wish).

Verb[edit]

vīs

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of volō
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • vis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • vis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • there is a storm at sea: mare ventorum vi agitatur et turbatur
    • straight on: rectā (viā)
    • to wish any one a prosperous journey: aliquem proficiscentem votis ominibusque prosequi (vid. sect. VI. 11, note Prosequi...)
    • to be robust, vigorous: bonis esse viribus
    • as well as I can; to the best of my ability: pro viribus or pro mea parte
    • to burst into a flood of tears: lacrimas, vim lacrimarum effundere, profundere
    • to enjoy good health: bona (firma, prospera) valetudine esse or uti (vid. sect. VI. 8., note uti...)
    • to lay hands on oneself: manus, vim sibi afferre
    • to perform the last offices of affection: supremis officiis aliquem prosequi (vid sect. VI. 11., note Prosequi...)
    • to have considerable influence on a question: magnam vim habere ad aliquid
    • to be favoured by Fortune; to bask in Fortune's smiles: fortunae favore or prospero flatu fortunae uti (vid. sect. VI. 8., note uti...)
    • to wish prosperity to an undertaking: aliquid optimis ominibus prosequi (vid. sect. VI. 11., note Prosequi...)
    • to honour, show respect for, a person: aliquem honore afficere, augere, ornare, prosequi (vid. sect. VI. 11., note Prosequi...)
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omnibus viribusor nervis contendere, ut
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omni ope atque opera or omni virium contentione eniti, ut
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: pro viribus eniti et laborare, ut
    • there seems a prospect of armed violence; things look like violence: res spectat ad vim (arma)
    • to express clearly, make a lifelike representation of a thing: exprimere aliquid verbis or oratione (vid. sect. VI. 3, note adumbrare...)
    • to possess presence of mind: praesenti animo uti (vid. sect. VI. 8, note uti...)
    • to behave with cruelty: crudelitate uti (vid. sect. VI. 8, note uti...)
    • to use insulting expressions to any one: contumeliosis vocibus prosequi aliquem (vid. sect. VI. 11, note Prosequi...)
    • to use violence against some one: vim adhibere, facere alicui
    • to do violence to a person: vim inferre alicui
    • to kill with violence: vim et manus afferre alicui (Catil. 1. 8. 21)
    • to meet force by force: vim vi depellere
    • to meet force by force: vi vim illatam defendere
    • to vote (in the popular assembly): suffragium ferre (vid. sect. VI. 4, note Not sententiam...)
    • to accuse a person of violence, poisoning: accusare aliquem de vi, de veneficiis
    • to procure a very large supply of corn: frumenti vim maximam comparare
    • by force of arms: vi et armis
    • to force a way, a passage: iter tentare per vim (cf. sect. II. 3)
    • to have recourse to force of arms: ad vim et arma descendere (vid. sect. V. 9, note Similarly...)
    • to fight hand-to-hand, at close quarters: collatis signis (viribus) pugnare
    • (ambiguous) the frost set in so severely that..: tanta vis frigoris insecuta est, ut
    • (ambiguous) bodily strength: vires corporis or merely vires
    • (ambiguous) to gain strength: vires colligere
    • (ambiguous) to lose strength: vires aliquem deficiunt
    • (ambiguous) as long as one's strength holds out: dum vires suppetunt
    • (ambiguous) to become old and feeble: vires consenescunt
    • (ambiguous) vivid, lively imagination: ingenii vis or celeritas
    • (ambiguous) what do you mean to do: quid tibi vis?
    • (ambiguous) oratorical power: vis dicendi
    • (ambiguous) what is the meaning, the original sense of this word: quae est vis huius verbi?
    • (ambiguous) the fundamental meaning of a word: vis et notio verbi, vocabuli
    • (ambiguous) enthusiasm: ardor, inflammatio animi, incitatio mentis, mentis vis incitatior
  • vis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • vis in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[2], Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  • Julius Pokorny (1959), Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch, in 3 vols, Bern, München: Francke Verlag

Further reading[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Particle[edit]

vis (invariable)

  1. Used to strengthen denying of the verb
    nav visnot at all
    es neiešu visI shall not go

Adverb[edit]

vis

  1. very, most (synonym of word pats)

Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vis.

Noun[edit]

vis m (plural vis)

  1. face

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. first-person singular preterite of vaie

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse víss

Adjective[edit]

vis (neuter singular vist, definite singular and plural vise, comparative visere, indefinite superlative visest, definite superlative viseste)

  1. wise

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. imperative of vise

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse víss, from Proto-Germanic *wīsaz. Akin to English wise.

Adjective[edit]

vis (masculine and feminine vis, neuter vist, definite singular and plural vise, comparative visare, indefinite superlative visast, definite superlative visaste)

  1. wise
    Han er ein vis mann.
    He is a wise man.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse vís, from Proto-Germanic *wīsō. Akin to English wise.

Noun[edit]

vis f or m or n (definite singular visen or visa or viset, indefinite plural visar or viser or vis, definite plural visane or visene or visa)

  1. a way, manner
    Synonym: måte
    Dette har vore gjort på ulike vis.
    This has been done in different ways.
    Her gjer med det på dette viset.
    We do it in this manner here.
Usage notes[edit]
  • The by far most common gender in use is neuter.
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

vis

  1. imperative of visa

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vīsus (act of looking; appearance).

Noun[edit]

vis m (oblique plural vis, nominative singular vis, nominative plural vis)

  1. (anatomy) face
  2. opinion

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vītis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vis f (plural vis)

  1. vine

Polabian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *vьśь.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

vis m

  1. all

Declension[edit]

This pronoun needs an inflection-table template.

References[edit]

  • Lehr-Spławiński, Tadeusz (1994) Słownik etymołogiczny języka drzewian połabskich. Zeszyt 6. (in Polish), Warszawa: Energia, page 991-992.

Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vis

  1. masculine/feminine plural of vil

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vīsum.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): [vis]

Noun[edit]

vis n (plural visuri or vise)

  1. dream; vision

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *vysь.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vȋs m (Cyrillic spelling ви̑с)

  1. (expressively, in the literature) height
    dići u visto raise,elevate
    skok u vishigh jump
  2. summit (of a hill)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • vis” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse víss, from Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable).

Adjective[edit]

vis (comparative visare, superlative visast)

  1. wise

Declension[edit]

Inflection of vis
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular vis visare visast
Neuter singular vist visare visast
Plural visa visare visast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 vise visare visaste
All visa visare visaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In de tre vise männen (the three wise men), an archaic weak masculine plural form vise is used.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse vís, from Proto-Germanic *wīsą.

Noun[edit]

vis n

  1. a way; manner in which something is done or happens

Declension[edit]

Declension of vis 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative vis viset vis visen
Genitive vis visets vis visens

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse víss, from Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable.)

Adjective[edit]

vi:s (neuter vist)

  1. aware
    ja voʈʈ int vis de
    I didn't notice you.
    han vart eint vis bjenom i ti
    He didn’t notice the bear in time.

Zealandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch visch, from Old Dutch fisc, from Proto-West Germanic *fisk, from Proto-Germanic *fiskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pisḱ-.

Noun[edit]

vis m (plural [please provide])

  1. fish