vel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: vel-, -vel, vél, vėl, vēl, veļ, and vęl

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin vel (or).

Noun[edit]

vel

  1. (logic) The symbol used to represent the inclusive or, which is a logical connective.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sainsbury, Mark (2001). Logical Forms — An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Blackwell Publishing. p. 55.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch vel, from Middle Dutch vel, from Old Dutch *fel, from Proto-Germanic *fellą, from Proto-Indo-European *pello-, *pelno-.

Noun[edit]

vel (plural velle, diminutive velletjie)

  1. A skin, a hide.
  2. A membrane, e.g. forming on boiling milk.
  3. A sheet (e.g. of paper; incorrectly used for a page).

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch vellen, from Middle Dutch vellen, from Old Dutch *fellen, from Proto-Germanic *fallijaną.

Verb[edit]

vel (present vel, present participle vellende, past participle gevel)

  1. (transitive) To fell.
  2. (transitive, of verdicts, opinions) To decide, to pronounce.

Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin vēlum.

Noun[edit]

vel m

  1. veil

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *wala, Proto-Indo-European *welH- (to turn, twist). From the same root of vjell and vjel.

Verb[edit]

vel (first-person singular past tense vela, participle velur)

  1. I feel nauseated, sick
Related terms[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan vel, from Latin vēlum. Compare Occitan vel, French voile, Spanish velo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vel m (plural vels)

  1. veil

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

vel

  1. Soft mutation of mel.

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. second-person singular imperative of velet

Danish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vel

  1. I suppose
    Der er vel noget sandhed i det.
    I suppose there is some truth in it.

Interjection[edit]

vel

  1. (used as a tag question) is it the case
    Der er ikke slanger, vel?
    There aren't any snakes, are there?
    Du er ikke sur på mig, vel?
    You are not angry with me, are you?

Antonyms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vɛl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vel
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch vel, from Old Dutch *fel, from Proto-West Germanic *fell, from Proto-Germanic *fellą, from Proto-Indo-European *pello-, *pelno-, whence Latin pellis, Greek πέλλα; cognate with German Fell.

Noun[edit]

vel n (plural vellen, diminutive velletje n)

  1. A skin, a hide.
    Haar velletje zat tussen de deur.
    Her skin was caught in the door.
  2. A fur, a pelt.
    Tientallen vellen van beren en wolven lagen opeengestapeld.
    Tens of pelts of bears and wolves had been stacked on each other.
  3. A sheet (e.g. of paper; incorrectly used for a page).
    Het glas van een gloeilamp is niet veel dikker dan een vel papier
    The glass of a lightbulb is not much thicker than a sheet of paper.
  4. A membrane, e.g. forming on boiling milk.
    Deze saus moet niet te lang koken, anders ontstaan er vellen.
    This sauce shouldn't boil for too long or else membranes will appear.
  5. A rag, a shred.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: vel
  • Jersey Dutch: vääl
  • Negerhollands: vel, fel
  • Indonesian: pel

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. first-person singular present indicative of vellen
  2. imperative of vellen

References[edit]

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]
  • Franck, Johannes (1892) Etymologisch woordenboek der nederlandsche taal (in Dutch), The Hague: 's-Gravenhage: Martinus Nijhoff

Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vel

  1. Alternative spelling of veel

Adjective[edit]

vel

  1. Alternative spelling of veel

Faroese[edit]

Noun[edit]

vel n (genitive singular vels, plural vel)

  1. tail (of a bird)

Declension[edit]

Declension of vel
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative vel velið vel velini
accusative vel velið vel velini
dative veli velinum velum velunum
genitive vels velsins vela velanna

German Low German[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vel

  1. Alternative spelling of veel

Adjective[edit]

vel

  1. Alternative spelling of veel

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vel, from Proto-Germanic *wela.

Adverb[edit]

vel (comparative betur, superlative best) (háttaratviksorð (adverb of manner))

  1. well
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. inflection of velja:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative singular

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin vel.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vɛl/
  • Hyphenation: vel

Conjunction[edit]

vel

  1. (rare) and/or (inclusive "or")
    • 1914, Félix Mirot, La Langue Auxiliaire, page 90:
      Me certe prenos akompananto: vel mea frato, vel mea kuzo.
      I will certainly bring company: either my sibling and/or my cousin.
    Ka vu volas manjor vel hamburger vel pizza?
    Do you want to eat a hamburger and/or a pizza?

Usage notes[edit]

After the adoption of the word by the Akademio in 1913-14, it didn't see much use. Those that actually used the word, didn't seem to use it correctly either. They recommended just using the exclusive for both (i.e. od and o), and by the following year, they proposed to annul the adoption. If they actually officially annulled the word is unknown.

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (abbreviation)
  • ƚ (abbreviation)
  • (abbreviation)
  • (abbreviation)

Etymology[edit]

From earlier *well, from *wels, from *welsi (you wish), thus originally the second-person singular present active indicative form of volō (I will, I wish). The semantic development may have been helped by the fortuitous similarity to -ve.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

vel

  1. or; and/or
  2. even

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • vĕl”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • vel”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vel”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • 1. VEL in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • 2. VEL in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • vĕl in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette, page 1,651
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • time assuages the most violent grief: vel maximos luctus vetustate tollit diuturnitas (Fam. 5. 16. 5)
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • uel” on page 2,021–2,022 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “vel”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 1,068/1

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of velt
  2. 2nd person singular imperative form of velt

Livonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Estonian veel, Latvian vēl (more, else, yet). According to Karulis, Latvian vēl is an inherited word cognate with vēls (late), thus perhaps an old Baltic borrowing in Finnic languages; this is supported by EES.[1] Its use before jo, juo forming comparatives of adjectives[2] could be a more recent calque, cf., Latvian labāk (better)vēl jo labāk (the better, even better).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ve'l

  1. more, else, yet
    • Tiit-Rein Viitso, Valts Ernštreits (2012–2013), Līvõkīel-ēstikīel-lețkīel sõnārōntõz, Tartu, Rīga: TÜ, LVA
      mis sa vel äd tō!
      what do you think you're doing!? ~ what else will you come up with! (lit. "what else do you want [to come up with]!")
      alā ajjõ vanā kouv vizzõ, koņtš ūž vel äb ūo vaļmõz
      do not fill up the old well until a new one is not (yet) ready

References[edit]

  1. ^ veel in Metsmägi, Iris; Sedrik, Meeli; Soosaar, Sven-Erik (2012), Eesti etümoloogiasõnaraamat, Tallinn: Eesti Keele Instituut, →ISBN
  2. ^ Renāte Blumberga, Tapio Mäkeläinen, Karl Pajusalu (2013), Lībieši: vēsture, valoda un kultūra, Rīga: Līvõ Kultūr sidām, →ISBN

Manx[edit]

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. present dependent form of bee

Usage notes[edit]

  • Use with cha primarily confined to higher registers.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vel, from Proto-Germanic *wela, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-.

Adverb[edit]

vel

  1. well

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vel, from Proto-Germanic *wela, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-. Akin to English well.

Adverb[edit]

vel

  1. well
  2. certainly, probably
    Ja, det er vel rett.
    Yes, that is probably true./Yes, I suppose that is true.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. present tense of velja and velje
  2. imperative of velja and velje

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *fell, whence also Old English fell.

Noun[edit]

vel n

  1. A fur.

Descendants[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wela (well), from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-. Cognate with Old English wel, Old Frisian wela, Old Saxon wela, Old High German wola, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐌻𐌰 (waila).

Adverb[edit]

vel (comparative betr, superlative bazt)

  1. well
  2. easily
  3. fully, amply, largely

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vēlum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vel m (plural vej)

  1. veil

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin vel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

vel

  1. (with pseudonyms) AKA, alias
    Synonyms: aka, alias

Further reading[edit]

  • vel in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • vel in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Church Slavonic велии (velii), from Proto-Slavic *velьjь.

Adjective[edit]

vel m or f or n (indeclinable)

  1. (dated, historical) great (preceding a medieval rank in Wallachia or Moldavia)

Further reading[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Volapük cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : vel
    Ordinal : velid

Numeral[edit]

vel

  1. seven

Derived terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

vel

  1. simple past tense of vall
    • 1927, “PAUDEEN FOUGHLAAN'S WEDDEEN”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, line 19:
      Vel bak.
      Fell back.

References[edit]

  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 133