aut

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See also: AUT, Aut, aut', áut, and aut-

Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus.

Adjective[edit]

aut m (feminine singular auta, masculine plural auc, feminine plural autes)

  1. high

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewti (on the other hand), from *h₂ew. Cognate with autem, Ancient Greek αὖ (), αὖτε (aûte), αὐτός (autós), αὐτάρ (autár).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

aut

  1. or (exclusive or)
    • Aut Caesar aut nihil.
      All or nothing
      (literally, “Either a Caesar or a nothing.”)
    • Aut disce aut discēde.
      Either you learn, or go away.
    • Vulgate, Tobiae 3.19:
      [] et aut ego indigna fuī illīs aut illī mihi forsitan dignī nōn fuērunt.
      [] and either I was unworthy for them, or they perhaps were not worthy for me.
  2. otherwise, or else (a consequence of the condition that the previous is false)
    Accipe nummōs nōnāgintā — aut nūllōs!
    Take 90 sesterces — or none at all!
  3. Introduces a correction to the previous words or an afterthought remark.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the meaning (1) typically placed before each coordinated element (aut...aut...aut), equivalent to "either...or".
  • Unlike vel, this word implies an exclusive "or"; i.e., one option or the other, but not both.

Descendants[edit]

  • Aragonese: u
  • Asturian: o
  • Catalan: o
  • Italian: o, od
  • Ligurian: ò
  • Occitan: o
  • Old French: ou
    • French: ou
  • Old Portuguese: ou
    • Galician: ou
    • Portuguese: ou
  • Romanian: au
  • Romansch: u
  • Spanish: o, u
  • Esperanto:
  • Ido: od, o

References[edit]

  • aut in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aut in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aut in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • twenty years and more: viginti anni et amplius, aut plus
    • geographical knowledge: regionum terrestrium aut maritimarum scientia
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *áutei, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ew-. Cognates include Lithuanian aũti, Proto-Slavic *uti (to put on) (> *jьzuti, *obuti), Hittite [script needed] (unu-, to adorn, decorate, lay (the table)), Latin *uō (to put on) (> exuō, induō).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [àwt]
  • Audio (LV):
    (file)

Verb[edit]

aut (tr., 1st conj., pres. aunu, aun, aun / auju, auj, auj, past āvu)

  1. put on footwear (shoes, boots, socks, etc.)
    zēns āva kājasthe boy put on footwear (lit. on his feet)
    aut kājas pastalāsto put on pastalas (simple footwear) (lit. to put one's feet into pastalas)
    aut kurpes kājasto put on shoes (lit. to put shoes on one's feet)
  2. nosēdos uz akmens un gribēju aut kājas, bet kurpes bija ļoti sabristas — I sat down on a rock and wanted to put shoes on (lit. to put (my) feet (into shoes)), but the shoes were very wet
    Žanis āva kājās stulmeņu zābakusŽanis put the long boots on (his) feet
  3. (figuratively, with kājas) to prepare for a journey (lit. to put on footwear)
    un tūliņ ķēniņš aun kājas savu sievu meklētand quickly the king puts on footwear to go looking for his wife

Usage notes[edit]

Note that aut can take two complements, the footwear or the subject's feet. Either can be the direct object, in which case the other will be a locative complement (i.e., either "to put shoes on one's feet" or "to put one's feet into shoes").

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Derksen, Rick (2015) , “auti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 73

Middle Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aut

  1. second-person singular imperfect indicative of mynet

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus.

Adjective[edit]

aut m (feminine singular auta, masculine plural auts, feminine plural autas)

  1. (Provençal) high
    Antonym: bas

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English out.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aut m inan

  1. (sports) touch (the part of a field beyond the touchlines or goal lines)
  2. (sports) the situation when the ball goes into touch

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

aut

  1. genitive plural of auto

Further reading[edit]

  • aut in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English out.

Noun[edit]

aut n (plural auturi)

  1. (soccer) ball out of play

Declension[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan) ault
  • (Sutsilvan) òlt
  • (Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) ot

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus.

Adjective[edit]

aut m (feminine singular auta, masculine plural auts, feminine plural autas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) high

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English out.

Noun[edit]

aut m (Cyrillic spelling аут)

  1. (sports) area outside the playground borders