vitis

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See also: Vitis

Friulian[edit]

Noun[edit]

vitis

  1. plural of vite

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *wéh₁itis (that which twines or bends, branch, switch), from *weh₁y- (to turn, wind, bend). See Latin vieō and English withe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vītis f (genitive vītis); third declension

  1. vine
    • c. 37 BCE – 30 BCE, Virgil, Georgicon 4.269
      vel psithia passos de vite racemos
      [] or dried clusters of grapes from Psithian vine[s]
    • c. 160-220 CE, Tertullian, De Judicio Domini, 22
      quid faciat laetis ut vitis abaestuet uvis
      What makes a vine hang down richly with grapes
  2. (historical) a vine staff, the baton or cane of a Roman centurion
Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative vītis vītēs
genitive vītis vītium
dative vītī vītibus
accusative vītem vītēs
ablative vīte vītibus
vocative vītis vītēs
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of vīta (life)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vītīs

  1. dative plural of vīta
  2. ablative plural of vīta

References[edit]

  • vitis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vitis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “vitis”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • vitis” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • vitis in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly