vite

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Vite, vîte, víte, and vitæ

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French viste, of disputed origin:

  • Derived from an onomatopoeia expressing rapid movement.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vit/
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

vite

  1. quickly

Adjective[edit]

vite (plural vites)

  1. (obsolete or informal) quick; fast

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vīta.

Noun[edit]

vite f (plural vitis)

  1. life

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvi.te/
  • Rhymes: -ite
  • Hyphenation: vì‧te

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

vite f (plural viti)

  1. screw
    collegarlo al corpo con una vite a filettatura
    attach it to the body with a threaded screw
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Ottoman Turkish: ویده

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin vītis, vītem, from Proto-Indo-European *wéh₁itis (that which twines or bends, branch, switch), from *weh₁y- (to turn, wind, bend).

Noun[edit]

vite f (plural viti)

  1. vine
    • c. 1500, Leonardo da Vinci, “La vite e l'albero vecchio”, in Favole:
      La vite, invecchiata sopra l’albero vecchio, cadde insieme con la ruina d’esso albero, e fu per la trista compagnia a mancare insieme con quello.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

vite f

  1. plural of vita
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

vīte

  1. ablative singular of vītis

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin vīta.

Noun[edit]

vite f

  1. life
  2. lifestyle, more
  3. life story

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading[edit]


Neapolitan[edit]

Noun[edit]

vite

  1. plural of vita

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French viste, of disputed origin; see vite.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vite m or f

  1. fast

Adverb[edit]

vite

  1. quickly, soon

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋiːtɛ/, [ˈʋiːt̪ə]

Verb[edit]

vite (imperative vit, present tense vet or veit, passive vites, simple past visste, past participle visst, present participle vitende)

  1. to know (be certain or sure about (something); have knowledge of)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse viti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vite m (definite singular viten, indefinite plural vitar, definite plural vitarne)

  1. (pre-1917 or dialectal) alternative form of vete (beacon)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

vite (present tense veit, past tense visste, past participle visst, passive infinitive vitast, present participle vitande, imperative vit)

  1. Alternative form of vita

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

vite

  1. plural of vită

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Participle[edit]

vite (Cyrillic spelling вите)

  1. feminine plural passive past participle of viti

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish vite (penalty), from Proto-Germanic *wītaną. Compare Icelandic víti and English wite (penalty).

Noun[edit]

vite n

  1. a (conditional) fine (to be paid if the offense is repeated)
    utdöma viteimpose a fine
    vid vite avunder penalty of a fine
Declension[edit]
Declension of vite 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative vite vitet viten vitena
Genitive vites vitets vitens vitenas
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective[edit]

vite

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of vit.