popa

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See also: Popa, pöpa, popã, and popă

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis (stern), possibly with influence from prora (prow).

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popes)

  1. stern, poop

Antonyms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan popa, from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis (stern), possibly with influence from prora (prow).

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popes)

  1. stern, poop
    Antonym: proa
    • 2002, Albert Sánchez Piñol, chapter 1, in La pell freda, La Campana, →ISBN:
      Feia trenta-tres dies que els dofins havien renunciat a la nostra popa i dinou que la tripulació expel·lia núvols de baf per la boca.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin puppa, variant of pūpa (girl).

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popes)

  1. (colloquial, Lleida) boob, titty

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

popa

  1. third-person singular past historic of poper

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese popa, from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis (stern), possibly with influence from prora (prow).

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popas)

  1. stern, poop

Antonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

popa m (genitive popae); first declension

  1. A priest's assistant (at a sacrifice)

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative popa popae
Genitive popae popārum
Dative popae popīs
Accusative popam popās
Ablative popā popīs
Vocative popa popae

Noun[edit]

popa f (genitive popae); first declension

  1. A woman who sold animals for sacrifice

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative popa popae
Genitive popae popārum
Dative popae popīs
Accusative popam popās
Ablative popā popīs
Vocative popa popae

Descendants[edit]

  • Portuguese: popa

References[edit]

  • popa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • popa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • popa in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • popa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • popa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • popa in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan popa, from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis (stern), possibly with influence from prora (prow).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpu.pɒ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popas)

  1. (nautical) stern, poop

Antonyms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese popa, from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis (stern), possibly with influence from prora (prow).

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popas)

  1. stern, poop

Antonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish popa, from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis (stern), possibly with influence from prora (prow).

Noun[edit]

popa f (plural popas)

  1. stern (back of a boat or ship)
    Antonym: proa

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]