Reconstruction:Proto-Slavic/gǫsь

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This Proto-Slavic entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Slavic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Etymology disputed. Two theories:

A direct inheritance from Proto-Balto-Slavic *gansís, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰh₂éns, citing the accentuation matching (i-stem with mobile accentuation) with that of the Baltic equivalent as well as the formal match between *gǫserъ (gander) with Latin ānser.[3]

Noun[edit]

*gǫ̑sь f[4]

  1. goose

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Vasmer, Max (1964–1973) , “гусь”, in Etimologičeskij slovarʹ russkovo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language] (in Russian), translated from German and supplemented by Oleg Trubačóv, Moscow: Progress
  • Olander, Thomas (2001) , “gǫsь gǫsi”, in Common Slavic accentological word list, Copenhagen: Editiones Olander: “m. c (SA 25; PR 138)”
  • Snoj, Marko (2016) , “gọ̑s”, in Slovenski etimološki slovar, Ljubljana: Inštitut za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, →ISBN: “*gǫ̑sь”

References[edit]

  1. ^ Meillet, Antoine (1924) Le slave commun, Paris: Champion
  2. ^ Živlóv, M. A. (2016) , “Review of S. Pronk-Tiethoff «The Germanic loanwords in Proto-Slavic»”, in Journal of Language Relationship[1] (in Russian), volume 14/1, Moscow: Institute of Linguistics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian State University for the Humanities, Gorgias Press, page 67:
    Отсутствие «сатемного» рефлекса в славянском при его наличии в балтийском было объяснено еще А. Мейе: в славянском (в отличие от балтийского) в словах, содержащих сибилянт *s, не наблюдается результатов перехода ПИЕ *ḱ > *s и *ǵ, ǵʰ > *z. Правило Мейе не было опровергнуто позднейшими исследователями — оно было просто забыто. [The absence of a “satem” reflex in the Slavic, when present in the Baltic, was explained by A. Meillet: in the Slavic (unlike the Baltic) words containing the sibilant *s, the results of the PIE *ḱ > *s and *ǵ, ǵʰ > *z transition are not observed. Meillet’s rule was not refuted by later researchers — it was simply forgotten.]
  3. ^ Pronk-Tiethoff, Saskia E. (2013) The Germanic loanwords in Proto-Slavic[2] (in English), Amsterdam - New York: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 193
  4. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) , “*gǫ̑sь”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 184: “f. i (c) ‘goose’”