gast

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See also: Gast and gäst

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gasten, from Old English gǣstan, from Proto-Germanic *gaistijaną. Also spelled ghast due to association with ghost.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gast (third-person singular simple present gasts, present participle gasting, simple past and past participle gasted)

  1. (obsolete) To frighten
    And be not so a-gast, for shame! —Geoffrey Chaucer, The House of Fame
    Or whether gasted by the noise I made, full suddenly he fled. —William Shakespeare, King Lear

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Noun[edit]

gast f (plural gasted)

  1. (vulgar, pejorative) whore, bitch

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *gast, from Proto-Germanic *gastiz.

Noun[edit]

gast m (plural gasten, diminutive gastje n)

  1. guest
  2. (chiefly in combinations) knave, worker, apprentice, delivery boy
  3. (colloquial) dude, chap
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

gast

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of gassen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of gassen

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gast

  1. Romanization of 𐌲𐌰𐍃𐍄

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From (West) Proto-Germanic *gaistaz. Cognate with Old Frisian gāst, Old Frisian gēst, Dutch geest, Old High German geist (German Geist). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeysd-, *ǵʰisd- (anger, agitation).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gāst m

  1. A soul, spirit, breath
    • Ne ne is gāst on mūþe heora. — There is not breath in their mouths.
    • Se gāst is hræd. — The spirit is nimble.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gast m (oblique plural gaz or gatz, nominative singular gaz or gatz, nominative plural gast)

  1. destruction

Adjective[edit]

gast m (oblique and nominative feminine singular gaste)

  1. destroyed; ravaged; decimated

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gastiz (whence also Old Norse gestr), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis; cognate with Latin hostis (enemy).

Noun[edit]

gast m (plural gesti)

  1. guest

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gastiz, whence also Old English ġiest.

Noun[edit]

gast m

  1. guest

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: gast
    • Westphalian:
      Ravensbergisch-Lippisch: Gast
      Sauerländisch: Gast
      Westmünsterländisch: Gast
    • Plautdietsch: Gaust
    • → West Frisian: gast

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

gast c

  1. A crew member on a ship
  2. (dated or poetic, dialect) A ghost

Declension[edit]

Declension of gast 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gast gasten gastar gastarna
Genitive gasts gastens gastars gastarnas

Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

gast f (plural geist)

  1. (vulgar, pejorative) bitch

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gast ast ngast unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.