ast

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See also: Ast, AST, ást, ăst, as't, -ast, aṣṭ, and åst

English[edit]

Verb[edit]

ast

  1. Eye dialect spelling of asked, simple past tense and past participle of ask

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin hasta (spear, lance).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ast m (plural asts or astos)

  1. spit, skewer
    pollastre a l'ast
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • “ast” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German ast, from Old High German ast, from Proto-Germanic *astaz. Cognate with German Ast, Dutch ast, Gothic 𐌰𐍃𐍄𐍃 (asts); also Old Armenian ոստ (ost), Ancient Greek ὄζος (ózos).

Noun[edit]

ast m (plural éste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) conifer branch
    Dar ast ist guuts holtz so prönnan.
    Conifer branches make excellent firewood.

References[edit]

  • “ast” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ast

  1. but, yet

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • ast in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ast in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Livonian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *astudak.

Verb[edit]

ast

  1. step

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *astaz

Noun[edit]

ast m

  1. branch

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: ast

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *astaz

Noun[edit]

ast m

  1. branch

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: ast