sat

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sæt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sat (not comparable)

  1. (Britain, predicative) Seated; sitting (down).
    • 2007, Bell, Tony, “eighteen”, in Life in the Bus Lane[1], Cambridge: Vanguard Press, →ISBN, page 103:
      Hold on, I’m sat on my arse while I’m writing this.

Verb[edit]

sat

  1. simple past tense and past participle of sit
    I sat in the middle of the park.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sat (plural sats)

  1. Abbreviation of satellite. (artificial orbital body)
  2. Abbreviation of satisfactory.
  3. Level of saturation (especially of oxygen in the blood).
    • 2010, Virginia Allum, Patricia McGarr, Cambridge English for Nursing Pre-intermediate Student's Book with Audio CD, Cambridge University Press (→ISBN), page 93:
      Also, your blood pressure and oxygen sats – that's the amount of oxygen in your blood.
    • 2012, Emily Forbes, Georgie's Big Greek Wedding?, Harlequin (→ISBN), page 44:
      [T]his is her third admission for breathing difficulties. The first two admissions we managed to control her and discharge her home with her mum. This time we can't get her oxygen sats up—they're actually falling.
    • 2015, Christopher J Gallagher, MD, Pure and Simple: Anesthesia Writtens Review IV Questions, Answers, Explanations 501-1000 (→ISBN):
      Intubation is not necessary unless his oxygen sat reading is low.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Noun[edit]

sat

  1. sea

Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sat

  1. past participle of sætte

Fiji Hindi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English shirt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sat

  1. shirt

References[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sat

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌰𐍄

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin satis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sat

  1. enough, sufficiently
    Ka tu esas sat maskula por kombatar me?
    Are you man enough to fight me?

Derived terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sat

  1. (law enforcement) Clipping of satuan (unit).

Kalasha[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit सप्त (sapta). Compare Hindi सात (sāt).

Numeral[edit]

sat

  1. seven; 7

Kedah Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sat

  1. For a moment, for a few minutes, for a second.
    Hang tunggu tang ni sat na, aku nak pi teghebey burung tu.
    You wait here for a second, I am going to slingshot the bird.
    Hang ni sat-sat pi tandas, sat-sat pi tandas.
    Why are you being like this, going to the toilet frequently (exaggerated to every few seconds).
  2. As a consequence, then, or else
    Jalan lekaih, sat gi tak dan masuk kelas.
    Walk faster; or else, we are not going to make it to the class.

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sat (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of satis (enough)

References[edit]

  • sat in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sat in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German sat, from Proto-Germanic *sadaz. Cognate with German satt, Dutch zat.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sat (masculine saten, neuter sat, comparative méi sat, superlative am saatsten)

  1. full, sated
    Ech sinn esou sat!
    I'm so full!
  2. drunk, inebriated

Declension[edit]


Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French chat

Noun[edit]

sat

  1. cat

References[edit]

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

sat

  1. Alternative form of schat

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

sat

  1. past tense of sitja, sitje, sitta and sitte

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂-. Compare Old Saxon sad, Dutch zat, Old English sæd, Old Norse saðr, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌸𐍃 (saþs).

Adjective[edit]

sat

  1. full, sated

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: sat

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Romanian fsat, probably from Albanian fshat (village), or from Byzantine Greek φουσσάτον (phoussáton, citadel), from Late Latin fossātum (entrenchment, place enclosed by a ditch), from Latin fossa (ditch), or possibly derived directly from Latin, but this is less likely.

Noun[edit]

sat n (plural sate)

  1. village, small rural settlement
  2. (archaic) field
    Synonym: câmp

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish ساعت(sâat), from Persian ساعت(sâ'at), from Arabic سَاعَة(sāʿa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȃt m (Cyrillic spelling са̑т)

  1. clock
  2. watch

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȃt m (Cyrillic spelling са̑т)

  1. hour
    Koliko sati?What time is it?

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Seychellois Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French chat

Noun[edit]

sat

  1. cat

References[edit]

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sat

  1. imperative of satmak