fume

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See also: fumé and fumê

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English [Term?], from Old French fum (smoke, steam, vapour), from Latin fūmus (vapour, smoke), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke), from *dʰewh₂- (to smoke, raise dust). More at dun, dusk, dust.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fjuːm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Noun[edit]

fume (plural fumes)

  1. A gas or vapour/vapor that is strong-smelling or dangerous to inhale.
    Don't stand around in there breathing the fumes while the adhesive cures.
  2. A material that has been vaporized from the solid or liquid state to the gas state and re-coalesced to the solid state.
    Lead fume is a greyish powder, mainly comprising lead sulfate.
  3. Rage or excitement which deprives the mind of self-control.
    the fumes of passion
    • 1698, Robert South, Twelve Sermons upon Several Subjects and Occasions:
      The Fumes of his Passion do as really intoxicate and confound his judging and discerning Faculty , as the Fumes of Drink discompose and stupify the Brain of a Man over - charged with it.
  4. Anything unsubstantial or airy; idle conceit; vain imagination.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      a show of fumes and fancies
  5. The incense of praise; inordinate flattery.
    • 1638, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy
      to smother him with fumes and eulogies
  6. (obsolete) A passionate person.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the sense of strong-smelling or dangerous vapor, the noun is typically plural, as in the example.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume (third-person singular simple present fumes, present participle fuming, simple past and past participle fumed)

  1. (transitive) To expose (something) to fumes; specifically, to expose wood, etc., to ammonia in order to produce dark tints.
  2. (transitive) To apply or offer incense to.
    • 1740, John Dyer, “The Ruins of Rome. A Poem.”, in Poems. [...] Viz. I. Grongar Hill. II. The Ruins of Rome. III. The Fleece, in Four Books, London: Printed by John Hughs, for Messrs. R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley, [], published 1759, OCLC 991281870, pages 42–43:
      Tyrian garbs, / Neptunian Albion's high teſtaceous food [i.e., oysters], / And flavour'd Chian wines with incenſe fum'd / To ſlake Patrician thirſt: for theſe, their rights / In the vile ſtreets they proſtitute to ſale; / Their ancient rights, their dignities, their laws, / Their native glorious freedom.
  3. (intransitive) To emit fumes.
  4. (intransitive) To pass off in fumes or vapours.
    • whose parts are kept from fuming away, not only by their fixity []
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To express or feel great anger.
    He’s still fuming about the argument they had yesterday.
  6. (intransitive, figuratively) To be as in a mist; to be dulled and stupefied.

Translations[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumar

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fumer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fumer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fumer

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attested since circa 1300. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese fumo (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin fūmus. Cognate with Portuguese fumo and Spanish humo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fume m (plural fumes)

  1. smoke
    • c1300, R. Martínez López (ed.), General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV. Oviedo: Publicacións de Archivum, page 209:
      coyda que o bafo et fume daquel fogo que ensuzou et [empoçoou] as agoas et aterra daly
      he thinks that the fumes and the smoke of that fire defiled and poisoned the waters and the soil there
    • 1348, J. Méndez Pérez & al. (eds.), El monasterio de San Salvador de Chantada, Santiago de Compostela: I. Padre Sarmiento, page 326:
      a vida deste mundo he asy como a sonbra, et quando ome se deleyta en ella he asy como o fumo que se vay logo
      the life in this world is like the shadow, and when a man delight in it is like the 'smoke, which soon goes away
  2. fume
    Synonyms: bafo, vapor
  3. (figuratively, in the plural) haughtiness

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumar

References[edit]

  • fume” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • fume” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • fume” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • fume” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fume” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

fūme

  1. vocative singular of fūmus

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French fum, from Latin fũmus, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fume (plural fumes)

  1. Visible gaseous emanations; fumes or smoke.
  2. Any sort of vapour or gaseous emanation.
  3. (physiology) Fumes as the supposed cause of feelings.
  4. (rare) An airborne scent or odour.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: fume
  • Scots: fume
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French fumer.

Verb[edit]

fume

  1. Alternative form of fumen

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume (present tense fumar, past tense fuma, past participle fuma, passive infinitive fumast, present participle fumande, imperative fum)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by fomme

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of fumar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of fumar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of fumar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fume

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of fumar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fumar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fumar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fumar.

Tarantino[edit]

Noun[edit]

fume

  1. smoke