gás

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See also: gas, Gas, gås, gås', gãs, gaś, and gą̊s

Faroese[edit]

gæs - geese

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gás, from Proto-Germanic *gans, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰans-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gás f (genitive singular gásar, plural gæs)

  1. goose (Anser)

Declension[edit]

Declension of gás
f25 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative gás gásin gæs gæsnar
accusative gás gásina gæs gæsnar
dative gás gásini gásum gásunum, gæsnum
genitive gásar gásarinnar gása gásanna

Related terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gas, a word coined by chemist Van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by Dutch geest ‎(breath, vapour, spirit) or from Ancient Greek χάος ‎(kháos, chasm, void).

Noun[edit]

gás m ‎(genitive singular gáis, nominative plural gáis)

  1. gas
  2. paraffin oil

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gás ghás ngás
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gans, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰans-. Germanic cognates include Old English gōs (English goose), Old Frisian gōs (West Frisian goes), Old Saxon gōs, gās (Low German Goos), Dutch gans, Old High German gans (German Gans).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ɡɑ̃ːs/

Noun[edit]

gás f (genitive gásar, plural gæss)

  1. goose
  2. vulva

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gaz, from Dutch gas, from Latin chaos, from Ancient Greek χάος ‎(kháos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gás m (plural gases)

  1. gas