singe

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See also: singé and sînge

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sengen, from Old English senġan, sænċġan (to singe, burn slightly, scorch, afflict), from Proto-West Germanic *sangijan (to burn, torch), from Proto-Indo-European *senk- (to burn). Cognate with West Frisian singe, sinzje (to singe), Saterland Frisian soange (to singe), Dutch zengen (to singe, scorch), German Low German sengen (to singe), German sengen (to singe, scorch), Icelandic sangur (singed, burnt, scorched).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɪnd͡ʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪndʒ

Verb[edit]

singe (third-person singular simple present singes, present participle singeing, simple past and past participle singed)

  1. (transitive) To burn slightly.
    • 1702, Sir Roger L’Estrange, “The First Viſion of the Algouazil (or Catchpole) Poſſest”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[21]:
      made combustible by Flame They treat of, we have pretty Game, For they their own Tail Singe, to save Us
  2. (transitive) To remove the nap of (cloth), by passing it rapidly over a red-hot bar, or over a flame, preliminary to dyeing it.
  3. (transitive) To remove the hair or down from (a plucked chicken, etc.) by passing it over a flame.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

singe (plural singes)

  1. A burning of the surface; a slight burn.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

singe (third-person singular simple present singes, present participle singing, simple past sange, past participle sunge)

  1. Obsolete form of sing.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German singen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

singe (third-person singular simple present singt, past participle gsunge, auxiliary haa)

  1. to sing

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French singe, from Old French singe, inherited from Latin sīmius.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

singe m (plural singes)

  1. monkey
    Synonym: (Louisiana) macaque m
  2. ape
  3. (derogatory) foolish or mischievous man
  4. (derogatory) shrewd man
    Synonym: renard
    Ne laisse personne entrer dans cette pièce, surtout ce singe-ci.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  5. (slang) hierarchical superior
    ― Allons voir le vieux singe ! soupira Maigret, qui n'avait jamais pu sentir le juge Coméliau.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

singe

  1. inflection of singen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

singe

  1. to sing

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

singe

  1. Alternative form of singen

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sīmius.

Noun[edit]

singe m (oblique plural singes, nominative singular singes, nominative plural singe)

  1. monkey (animal)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: singe
  • Norman: sînge (Jersey)

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German singen, Dutch zingen, English sing, Swedish sjunga.

Verb[edit]

singe

  1. to sing

Sathmar Swabian[edit]

Verb[edit]

singe

  1. to sing

References[edit]

  • Claus Stephani, Volksgut der Sathmarschwaben (1985)

Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish سونگو(süngü).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

singe (n class, plural singe)

  1. bayonet