sandbox

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: sand box and Sandbox
This page is NOT a sandbox. For the Wiktionary test page, see Wiktionary:Sandbox.

English

Etymology

sand +‎ box.

Pronunciation

Noun

sandbox (plural sandboxes)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. (US) A children's play area consisting of a box filled with sand.
  2. A box filled with sand that is shaped to form a mould for metal casting.
  3. A container for sand or pounce, used historically before blotting paper.
  4. An animal's litter box.
  5. (rail transport) A box carried on locomotives, from which sand runs onto the rails in front of the driving wheels, to prevent slipping.
    • 1941 August, “Notes and News: The Swiss South Eastern Railway”, in Railway Magazine, page 376:
      For the most part they were small standard gauge 0-6-0 side tanks of the type illustrated, with long tapered chimneys and an unusual feature for the Continent in the shape of domeless boilers, the protuberance just behind the chimney being a sandbox.
  6. (computing) An isolated area where a program can be executed with a restricted portion of the resources available.
    Running a program in a sandbox can prevent it from doing any damage to the system.
  7. (Wikimedia jargon) A page on a wiki where users are free to experiment without destroying or damaging any legitimate content.
  8. (US, military, slang, usually "The Sandbox") The Middle East.

Synonyms

  • (play enclosure with sand): sandpit (UK):

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

sandbox (third-person singular simple present sandboxes, present participle sandboxing, simple past and past participle sandboxed)

  1. (computing, transitive) To restrict (a program, etc.) by placing it in a sandbox.
    • 2011, Richard Wagner, Building Facebook Applications For Dummies:

Derived terms