buc

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: BUC, buć, buč, bức, Buć, and буч

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Frankish *būk (belly), from Proto-Germanic *būkaz (belly, stomach).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

buc m (plural bucs)

  1. an object that has a cavity
  2. belly; abdomen
  3. (aeronautics) fuselage
    Synonym: fuselatge
  4. (automotive) the bodywork of a car
  5. (nautical) hull
  6. (vehicles) the body of a carriage
  7. beehive
  8. (architecture) the shell or outer walls enclosing a house or a staircase
  9. (furniture) the cabinetwork enclosing the drawers, either fully or partially
  10. (geography) riverbed
  11. (military, historical) cuirass
  12. (engineering) The metal coating of a nuclear reactor vessel

Synonyms[edit]

Holonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly from a Latin root buculus (young bull, ox, steer). Compare French bugle, beugle.

Noun[edit]

buc m

  1. small ox

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Catalan and Occitan buc. Probably of Germanic origin.

Noun[edit]

buc m

  1. beehive
Synonyms[edit]

K'iche'[edit]

Noun[edit]

buc

  1. (Classical K'iche') bird

Middle Dutch[edit]

Noun[edit]

buc m

  1. Alternative form of boc

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English būc.

Noun[edit]

buc (plural bucs)

  1. Alternative form of bouk

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English bucca.

Noun[edit]

buc

  1. Alternative form of bukke

Occitan[edit]

buc

Noun[edit]

buc m

  1. beehive (home of bees)

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bukkaz.

Noun[edit]

buc m

  1. buck, male goat
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]
  • Middle Dutch: boc
Further reading[edit]
  • buk”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *būkaz.

Noun[edit]

būc m

  1. belly, stomach
  2. womb
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]
Further reading[edit]
  • būk”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *būkaz

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

būc m

  1. belly, stomach
  2. jug, pitcher, container
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bukkaz (male deer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

buc m

  1. Alternative form of bucc (buck)

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /but͡s/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Polish bucić się.

Noun[edit]

buc m pers

  1. (colloquial, derogatory) jerk, douche, arrogant person
    Synonyms: dupek, kutas
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Butzemann.

Noun[edit]

buc m anim

  1. (rare) bogeyman
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • buc in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • buc in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown. Possibly a substratum word, perhaps from Dacian *bukas, akin to Albanian byk (or alternatively derived from it). May be linked to Polish buch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

buc m (plural buci)

  1. chaff

Declension[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Sutsilvan) betg
  • (Sursilvan) buca
  • (Sutsilvan) betga

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adverb[edit]

buc

  1. (Sursilvan) not