boc

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: BOC, BoC, bòc, BÖC, bọc, boç, boć, Boć, and bŏć

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Pre-Roman, possibly from Old High German boc, from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuǵ-.

Noun[edit]

boc m (plural bocs)

  1. buck (male goat)

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boc m (plural bocs)

  1. (Norman dialect) type of horse-drawn carriage

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish boc (he-goat) (compare modern poc), from Old English bucca.

Noun[edit]

boc m (genitive singular boic, nominative plural boic)

  1. buck, playboy
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare poc (butt (as from a goat), hurling-stroke).

Noun[edit]

boc m (genitive singular boic)

  1. (of ball) bounce
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
boc bhoc mboc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch buc, from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz.

Noun[edit]

boc m

  1. buck, male goat

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: bok
  • Limburgish: bók
  • West Flemish: buk

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

boc

  1. Alternative form of booke

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bōks, whence also Old Frisian bōk (West Frisian boek), Old Saxon bōk (Low German Book), Dutch boek, Old High German buoh (German Buch), Old Norse bók (Danish bog, Norwegian bok), Swedish bok), Gothic 𐌱𐍉𐌺𐌰 (bōka). The Germanic root is often taken to be related to the word for beech, the wood of rune-tablets.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bōc f

  1. book
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bōkō.

Noun[edit]

bōc f

  1. beech
    Synonyms: bōctrēow, bēċe
Declension[edit]

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *bukk, from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz, whence also Old English buc, Old Norse bukkr; from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuǵ- (ram).

Noun[edit]

boc m

  1. buck (male deer)

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bukkos

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boc m (genitive buic, nominative plural buic)

  1. he-goat
    • c. 850-875, Turin Glosses and Scholia on St. Mark, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 484–94, Tur. 110c
      Ba bés leusom do·bertis dá boc leu dochum tempuil, ⁊ no·léicthe indala n‑ái fon díthrub co pecad in popuil, ⁊ do·bertis maldachta foir, ⁊ n⟨o⟩·oircthe didiu and ó popul tar cenn a pecthae ind aile.
      It was a custom with them that two he-goats were brought by them to the temple, and one of the two of them was let go to the wilderness with the sin of the people, and curses were put upon him, and thereupon the other was slain there by the people for their sins.

Declension[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative boc, bocc bocL, bocc buic(c)L
Vocative buic(c) bocL, bocc buccuH
Accusative bocN, bocc bocL, bocc buccuH
Genitive buic(c)L boc, bocc bocN, bocc
Dative buc(c)L bocaib bocaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: boc
  • Scottish Gaelic: boc

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
boc boc
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mboc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

boc f

  1. Alternative spelling of bok

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish boc, from Old Irish boc, poc(c) (he-goat), from Proto-Celtic *bukkos.

Noun[edit]

boc m (genitive singular buic, plural buic)

  1. buck, roebuck
  2. billygoat, male goat
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

boc (past bhoc, future bocaidh, verbal noun bocadh, past participle bocte)

  1. bounce, leap/jump (up and down), skip
  2. prance
  3. flutter
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

boc m

  1. deceit, fraud
  2. blow, box, stroke

References[edit]

  • boc” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.