jug

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: jŭg, IPA(key): /d͡ʒʌɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English jugge, iugge, of uncertain origin. Possibly a variant of Middle English jubbe, jobbe, iubbe, geobbe, itself of unknown origin; or perhaps continuing (in altered form) Old English ċēac (pitcher; jug). Compare also jug (a low woman, maidservant), from Jug, familiar form of Joanna.

Noun[edit]

Example of jug

jug (countable and uncountable, plural jugs)

  1. A serving vessel or container, typically circular in cross-section and typically higher than it is wide, with a relatively small mouth or spout, an ear handle and often a stopper or top.
  2. The amount that a jug can hold.
  3. (slang) Jail.
    • 1988, Roald Dahl, Matilda
      'I'm telling you trade secrets,' the father said, 'So don't you go talking about this to anyone else. You don't want me put in jug do you?'
    • 1998, John Gunn, Dear Descendants: Recollections for a Gunn Family History 1945-1957 (page 19)
      I was 'counsel for the defence', or 'prisoner's friend'. My chap had deserted for nearly two years and spent six months in a civvy jug. With papers under my arm and serious countenance I visited him in his cell day after day, []
  4. (vulgar, slang, chiefly in the plural) A woman's breasts.
    • 1985, Epoch, Volumes 24-25:
      I was sucking my mom's left jug when I heard JD say, "Now we will experience the burden of the past."
    • 2010, Ben Niemand, The Sexperts, →ISBN:
      With her left hand on her right jug, she put her mouth to her other tit.
    • 2010, David Mason, Devil's food:
      I blew into her ear, and trailed a finger idly down her shoulder until I reached her left jug, the better of a nearly perfect pair.
  5. (New Zealand) An upright electric kettle.
  6. (CB radio slang, chiefly in the plural) A kind of large, high-powered vacuum tube.
    • 2001, 73 Amateur Radio Today (issues 482-493, page 8)
      [] as shown in the August 2000 issue, using a pair of my favorite jugs, 807s.
  7. (climbing) A hold large enough for both hands
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Verb[edit]

jug (third-person singular simple present jugs, present participle jugging, simple past and past participle jugged)

  1. (transitive) To stew in an earthenware jug etc.
    jugged hare
  2. (transitive, slang) To put into jail.
  3. (intransitive) To utter a sound like "jug", as certain birds do, especially the nightingale.
  4. (intransitive, of quails or partridges) To nestle or collect together in a covey.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Blend of Jack Russell +‎ pug

Noun[edit]

jug (plural jugs)

  1. A small mixed breed of dog created by mating a Jack Russell terrier and a pug.
    • 2013, Lost & Found: True tales of love and rescue from Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, Penguin Group:
      When the dog’s owners returned with their shopping, I asked what the little dog was. She was a Jug, a Jack Russell-Pug cross. We found out lots about this crossbreed, thought long and hard, and decided a Jug and a Spitz could work really well together.
    • 2014, Alan Kenworthy, Jugs: Buying, Caring For, Grooming, Health, Training and Understanding Your Jug Dog or Puppy, Feel Happy Limited
    • 2015, George Hoppendale, Jugs: Jug Dog Complete Owners Manual - Jug book for care, costs, feeding, grooming, health and training, Internet Marketing Business
    • 2018, Cheryl Murphy, Dogs just wanna have FUN!, Veloce Publishing, page 110:
      Stanley ¶ Jug (Jack Russell/Pug cross); 18 months old; keeps fit chasing his ball or frisbee, but would rather be laid on his back, snoring

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably from Latin jugum. A folk etymology claims that it is an acronym for "justice under God" or "judgment under God". [1][2]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

jug (plural jugs)

  1. (US, Roman Catholicism, countable or uncountable) detention (after-school student punishment)
    • 1970, Brown, Kenneth H., The Narrows[3], New York City: The Deal Press:
      “Take a week’s Jug,” he said, “and keep your nose clean.”
    • 2017 June 12, Katsouros, Stephen, N., S.J., Come To Believe: How the Jesuits are Reinventing Education (Again)[4], Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books, →ISBN, page 27:
      I had another role that earned me almost no appreciation at all: I served as the master after classes in the JUG room, where students appeared when they received detention.
    • 2017 September 1, Healey, Tom, “Jug 'Em with a Jugum”, in Lessons from Loyola Hall[5], Cleveland: Saint Ignatius High School, retrieved 2021-11-24:
      In days gone by jugs included the memorization of Shakespeare or the writing out of some well-known document like the Constitution.
    • 2018 October 16, Slowik, Ted, “Slowik: Reunion reveals changes to high school, people and places in 35 years”, in Chicago Tribune[6], retrieved 2021-11-24:
      A common infraction that landed pupils in jug was getting caught using a stairwell that was reserved for use by faculty and other adults.
    • 2020 March 8, Clevenger, Steele, “A Look Back at JUGs”, in The Jesuit Chronicle[7], Beaverton, Oregon: Jesuit High School, retrieved 2021-11-24:
      In addition to JUGs and disciplinary lectures, spats and hacks, paddles used to smack misbehaving students, often went with receiving a JUG.
Usage note[edit]

This is the preferred term for after-school detentions in Roman Catholic schools run by the Society of Jesus in the United States.

Verb[edit]

jug (third-person singular simple present jugs, present participle jugging, simple past and past participle jugged)

  1. (US, Roman Catholicism, transitive) to issue a detention (to a student)
    • 2007 June 19, Siler, Julia Flynn, The House of Mondavi: The Rise and Fall of an American Wine Dynasty[8], New York City: Penguin Group, →ISBN, page 60:
      Students would say they “got JUGged,” meaning they’d been disciplined by a teacher. Most of the time punishment entailed memorizing a passage of a text or an obscure snatch of poetry.
    • 2009, Varallo, Anthony, This Day in History[9], Iowa City, Iowa: University of Iowa Press, →ISBN, page 6:
      The first time I met Ben was in after-school detention. He’d been jugged for faking his mom’s signature, and I was serving for clapping erasers in the hallway.

Albanian[edit]

Albanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sq

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Proto-Slavic *jùgъ (south (wind))[1] (cf. South Slavic Bulgarian and Serbo-Croatian jug (south)).

Noun[edit]

jug m (indefinite plural -, definite singular jugu, definite plural -)

  1. south

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “jug”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 160

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin jugum, iugum, from Proto-Italic *jugom, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Noun[edit]

jug n (plural juguri)

  1. yoke

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jugъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jȕg m (Cyrillic spelling ју̏г)

  1. south

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Albanian: jug

See also[edit]

N NW W SW S SO O NO
sjever sjeverozapad zapad jugozapadno jug jugoistok istok sjeveroistok
sever severozapad ishod
śever

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jugъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jȗg or jȕg m inan

  1. south

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nominative júg
genitive júga
singular
nominative júg
accusative júg
genitive júga
dative júgu
locative júgu
instrumental júgom
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nominative jùg
genitive júga
singular
nominative jùg
accusative jùg
genitive júga
dative júgu
locative júgu
instrumental júgom

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jug”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran