juke

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See also: jouk and jook

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Gullah juke, jook, joog (wicked, disorderly) (compare Wolof and Bambara dzug (unsavory)).[1][2][3]

Noun[edit]

juke (plural jukes)

  1. (Southern US) A roadside cafe or bar, especially one with dancing and sometimes prostitution.
  2. Short for jukebox.
    • 2011, Nelson Algren, Never Come Morning
      The juke played five times for a quarter and she never wearied of tapping. Nor did she tire of the same record five times in a row; she was too indolent to select more than one number.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

juke (third-person singular simple present jukes, present participle juking, simple past and past participle juked)

  1. to play dance music, or to dance, in a juke
    • 1941 December, Arthur K. Moore, “Jouk”, in American Speech, page 319:
      ‘Let's jouk’ is an invitation to dance, but ‘Let's go joukin’’ is a request for a date.
    • 1958, Tennessee Williams, Orpheus Descending, New York: New Directions, OCLC 496105926:
      I want you to go juking with me... that's riding and stopping to drink and dance

Etymology 2[edit]

From Jamaican Creole jook.

Verb[edit]

juke (third-person singular simple present jukes, present participle juking, simple past and past participle juked)

  1. (slang) to hit
  2. (prison slang) to stab
    • 1992, Ed McBain, Kiss:
      "None of the Latinos liked him."
      "So now he's dead."
      "So go talk to the other ten thousand people could've juked him."
    • 2007, Teenager filmed by friend as he stabbed 16-year-old student to death (in Mail Online, 9 February 2007) [1]
      On the internet that night Asghar told a friend: "I'll bang him and then f*** it man, might as well juke [stab] him up tomorrow."
    • 2012, Russell Banks, Book of Jamaica:
      He beat me up a couple of times, and I got scared, so one night when he started up again, I just juked him. Three times in the chest, and it still didn't kill him! But I had to go to jail for a whole year.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:stab
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (to stab): jook (/dʒʊk/)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English jowken (bend)

Verb[edit]

juke (third-person singular simple present jukes, present participle juking, simple past and past participle juked)

  1. (intransitive) To deceive or outmaneuver someone using a feint, especially in American football or soccer
    Synonym: dummy
    • 2009, January 5, “Pat Borzi”, in Eagles Elude Vikings, but Giants Stand in the Way[2]:
      Turning the Vikings'¯ blitz against them, Westbrook took a screen pass from Donovan McNabb, then juked and scooted 71 yards for a touchdown.
    • 2015, Rick Campbell, Empire Rising:
      Just before the Hongqi closed to within range of its proximity fuse, Vandal juked hard left and kicked in his afterburners. The first missile sped by without detonating. Vandal juked hard left again, completing a 180-degree turn.
  2. (transitive) To deceive or outmaneuver, using a feint.
    • 2008, Anthony Swofford, Exit A:
      The runner juked Connor, the runner juked Smith, and Severin centered on him; he was five yards out, he screamed, he was a yard out, he screamed, he hit the kid so hard that both of their helmets flew off their heads.
    • 2015, Peter Guy George, The Tony Crowne Mysteries Box Set: Books 1-3:
      He juked Judd out of his shoes, reversed his field, juked Tony, juked Nick, and pretty much juked the entire Bobcats kickoff team on the way to a seventy-two yard return for a touchdown.
  3. (intransitive) To bend the neck; to bow or duck the head.
    • 1692, Roger L'Estrange, Fables of Æsop and other eminent mythologists with morals and reflexions, London: R. Sare [et alia], OCLC 671318525, Two Laden Asses:
      The Money-Merchant, I warrant ye, was ſo Proud of his Truſt, and of his Bell, that he went Juking and Toſſing of his Head, and Tabring with his Feet all the way, as if no Ground would hold him.
  4. (transitive) To manipulate deceptively.
    • 2010, Clive Cussler, ‎Jack Du Brul, The Silent Sea:
      The pilot instinctively juked the nimble chopper, but with so many bullets in the air, and so many of them spreading far from their intended target, it was impossible to evade them all.
    • 2012, Dennis E. Showalter, ‎Harold C. Deutsch, If the Allies Had Fallen: Sixty Alternate Scenarios of World War II, page 84:
      Veteran pilots “juked” their bombers to throw off the gunners' aim.
    • 2013, David Bzdak, ‎Joanna Crosby, ‎Seth Vannatta, The Wire and Philosophy: This America, Man, page 75:
      As Roland “Prez” Pryzbylewski knows, there's another problem with treating good stats as good work: They can be juked. “All this so we score higher on the state tests? If we're teaching the kids the test questions, what is assessing in them?"
    • 2014, William Deresiewicz, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life, page 35:
      Schools are ever more adept at juking their admissions stats, using aggressive marketing practices to gin up larger and larger numbers of applicants, many of whom they know they'll never admit (the so-called “attract to reject” strategy)

Noun[edit]

juke (plural jukes)

  1. (sports) A feint.
    Synonym: dummy
  2. The neck of a bird.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lorenzo Dow Turner, “West African Survivals in the Vocabulary of Gullah” (Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association, 1938)
  2. ^ Will McGuire, “Dzug, Dzog, Dzugu, Jook, Juke”, Time, vol. 35, no. 5 (1940), p. 12
  3. ^ Eric Partridge (2014) , “juke”, in Tom Dalzell and Terry Victor, editors, The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, London; New York, N.Y.: Routledge, →ISBN, page 448