pelvis

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: pélvis

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pelvis (basin), from Old Latin peluis (basin), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (container). Compare Sanskrit पलव (palava, wicker-work basket for catching fish), Ancient Greek πήληξ (pḗlēx, helmet).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛlvɪs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlvɪs

Noun[edit]

pelvis (plural pelvises or pelves)

  1. (anatomy) The large compound bone structure at the base of the spine that supports the legs. It consists of hip bone, sacrum and coccyx.
  2. (anatomy) A funnel-shaped cavity, especially such a cavity in the kidney into which urine passes towards the ureter

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pelvis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pelvis f (plural pelvis)

  1. pelvis

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pelvis m (plural pelvis)

  1. pelvis

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Latin peluis (basin), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (container). Compare Sanskrit पलव (palava, wicker-work basket of for catching fish), Ancient Greek πήληξ (pḗlēx, helmet).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pēlvis f (genitive pēlvis); third declension

  1. shallow bowl or basin

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem, accusative singular in -im or occasionally -em, ablative singular in or -e).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pēlvis pēlvēs
Genitive pēlvis pēlvium
Dative pēlvī pēlvibus
Accusative pēlvim
pēlvem
pēlvēs
pēlvīs
Ablative pēlvī
pēlve
pēlvibus
Vocative pēlvis pēlvēs

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: pelvis
  • English: pelvis
  • French: pelvis
  • Galician: pelve
  • Portuguese: pelve, pélvis
  • Spanish: pelvis

Further reading[edit]

  • pelvis”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pelvis”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pelvis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pelvis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • pelvis”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pelvis”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pelvis.

Noun[edit]

pelvis n (plural pelvisuri)

  1. pelvis

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pelvis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpelbis/ [ˈpel.β̞is]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -elbis
  • Syllabification: pel‧vis

Noun[edit]

pelvis f (plural pelvis)

  1. pelvis

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]