justice

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See also: Justice

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English justice, borrowed from Old French justise, justice (Modern French justice), from Latin iustitia (righteousness, equity), from iustus (just), from ius (right), from Proto-Italic *jowos, perhaps literally "sacred formula", a word peculiar to Latin (not general Italic) that originated in the religious cults, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-. Displaced native Middle English rightwished, rightwisnes "justice" (from Old English rihtwīsnes "justice, righteousness", compare Old English ġerihte "justice").

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

justice (countable and uncountable, plural justices)

  1. The state or characteristic of being just or fair.
    the justice of a description
    • Shakespeare
      This even-handed justice / Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice / To our own lips.
  2. The ideal of fairness, impartiality, etc., especially with regard to the punishment of wrongdoing.
    Justice was served.
  3. Judgment and punishment of a party who has allegedly wronged another.
    to demand justice
  4. The civil power dealing with law.
    Ministry of Justice
    the justice system
  5. A title given to judges of certain courts; capitalized as a title.
    Mr. Justice Krever presides over the appellate court
  6. Correctness, conforming to reality or rules.

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Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French justise, justice, borrowed from Latin iūstitia, jūstitia. Cf. also justesse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

justice f (plural justices)

  1. justice

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Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French justise, justice, borrowed from Latin iūstitia, jūstitia (righteousness, equity), from iūstus (just), from iūs (right), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-.

Noun[edit]

justice f (plural justices)

  1. (Jersey) justice

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

justice f (oblique plural justices, nominative singular justice, nominative plural justices)

  1. Alternative form of justise