civil

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See also: Civil

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English civil, borrowed from Old French civil, from Latin cīvīlis (relating to a citizen), from cīvis (citizen). Cognate with Old English hīwen (household), hīrǣden (family). More at hind; hird.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: ʹsĭv-əl IPA(key): /ˈsɪv.əl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪvəl

Adjective[edit]

civil (comparative more civil, superlative most civil)

  1. (not comparable) Having to do with people and government office as opposed to the military or religion.
    She went into civil service because she wanted to help the people.
  2. (comparable) Behaving in a reasonable or polite manner.
    It was very civil of him to stop the argument.
    Antonyms: anti-civil, impolite, inconsiderate, noncivil, rude
  3. (law) Relating to private relations among citizens, as opposed to criminal matters.
    a civil case
  4. Secular.
    • 1680, A Practical Discourse of Regeneration:
      As if our Saviour had said, No man can enter into heaven except he be born again; so as he speaketh not only of notorious Sinners, as Adulterers, Drunkards, Swearers, & c. but of all who are in their natural condition, tho' they live never so unblameably, free from scandalous sins, if they be not born again, their civil Righteousness will do them little good, for they shall never see the Kingdom of God.
    • 2008, Jerald Finney, God Betrayed, →ISBN, page 174:
      The word from which "evil" in Romans 13.4 is translated means "generally opposed to civil goodness or virtue, in a commonwealth, and not to spiritual good, or religion, in the church.
    • 2013, John Calvin, Calvin's Complete Commentary, Volume 7: Acts to Ephesians:
      Some grammarians explain this passage as referring to a civil sanctity, in respect of the children being reckoned legitimate, but in this respect the condition of unbelievers is in no degree worse.

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from civil

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]

  • civil at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis.

Adjective[edit]

civil (epicene, plural civiles)

  1. civil, civilian

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • "civil" in Diccionariu de la Llingua Asturiana

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil (masculine and feminine plural civils)

  1. civil

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil

  1. civil (all senses), civilian

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of civil
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular civil 2
Neuter singular civilt 2
Plural civile 2
Definite attributive1 civile
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil (feminine singular civile, masculine plural civils, feminine plural civiles)

  1. civil (war, marriage etc.)
  2. (politics) lay
  3. civilian
  4. (literary) civil, courteous, polite

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

civil m (plural civils)

  1. civilian

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis.

Adjective[edit]

civil m or f (plural civís)

  1. civil, civilian

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • "civil" in Real Academia Galega

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil (not comparable)

  1. civil, civilian (not associated with the armed forces)

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis, from cīvis (citizen), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (to lie down, settle; home, family; love; beloved).

Adjective[edit]

civil m

  1. (Jersey) polite
  2. (Jersey) civil

Derived terms[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis.

Adjective[edit]

civil m (feminine singular civila, masculine plural civils, feminine plural civilas)

  1. civil

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis (civil), from cīvis (citizen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil m or f (plural civis, comparable)

  1. civil; civilian (not relating to the military or clergy)
    Se não quiser levar um tiro, use roupas civis.If you don’t want to be shot, use civilian clothing.
  2. civic (relating to citizens)
    Deves cumprir tua obrigação civil.You must perform your civic duty.
  3. (law) relating to civil law
    Estudo direito civil.I study civil law.
  4. occurring between the inhabitants of the same country
    Guerra civil.Civil war.
  5. civil (behaving in a reasonable or polite manner)
    Seja mais civil e pare de criticar as pessoas.Be more civil and stop criticising people.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

civil m, f (plural civis)

  1. civilian, non-combatant (person who is not a member of the military, police or belligerent group)

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French civil, Latin civilis.

Adjective[edit]

civil m or n (feminine singular civilă, masculine plural civili, feminine and neuter plural civile)

  1. civil

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

civil m (plural civili)

  1. civilian

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Zivil, from French civil, from Latin cīvīlis (civic, civil), from cīvis (citizen).

Noun[edit]

cìvīl m (Cyrillic spelling цѝвӣл)

  1. civilian (not related to the military armed forces)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvīlis (civil, civic), from cīvis (citizen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil (plural civiles) (superlative civilísimo)

  1. civil (all senses)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

civil

  1. civil; having to do with people and organizations outside military or police, sometimes also outside of other team-based activities, such as a professional sports team

Declension[edit]

Inflection of civil
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular civil
Neuter singular civilt
Plural civila
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 civile
All civila
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.