loch

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See also: Loch

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Scottish Gaelic loch.

Noun[edit]

loch ‎(plural lochs)

  1. (Scotland) A lake.
  2. (Scotland) A bay or arm of the sea.
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

(lake):

Hyponyms[edit]

(sea inlet):

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from French looch, from Arabic [Term?].

Noun[edit]

loch

  1. Alternative form of looch

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Loch(hole)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loch m

  1. (colloquial) nick, slammer (prison)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • loch in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • loch in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Dutch log.

Noun[edit]

loch m ‎(plural lochs)

  1. (nautical) chip log, log

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from English loch, from Scottish Gaelic loch.

Noun[edit]

loch m ‎(plural lochs)

  1. loch

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish loch, from Proto-Indo-European *lakus (compare Latin lacus, Old English lagu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loch m ‎(genitive singular locha, nominative plural lochanna)

  1. lake

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *lakus.

Noun[edit]

loch n, m

  1. lake
  2. inlet of the sea
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

loch

  1. black, dark
Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
loch
also lloch after a proclitic
loch
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
loch
also lloch after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Polish[edit]

loch

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Loch(hole), from Middle High German loch, from Old High German loh, from Proto-Germanic *luką(lock; hole), from Proto-Indo-European *lewg-(to bend; turn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loch m inan

  1. dungeon (an underground prison or vault)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

loch f pl

  1. genitive plural of locha

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Scottish Gaelic loch.

Noun[edit]

loch ‎(plural lochs)

  1. lake, loch, firth

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish loch, from Proto-Indo-European *lakus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ɫ̪ɔx], /ɫ̪ɔx/

Noun[edit]

loch f ‎(genitive singular locha, plural lochan)

  1. lake
  2. arm of the sea
  3. fjord

Derived terms[edit]