logge

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Italian logge, from Italian singular loggia, from Old French loge, from Late Latin laubia, from Frankish *laubjā (pergola).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɒd͡ʒeɪ/, /ˈloʊd͡ʒeɪ/

Noun[edit]

logge

  1. plural of loggia

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English logge (stick), see below.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

logge (plural logges)

  1. Obsolete spelling of log
    • 1623, John Speed, History of Great Britaine Under the Conquests of Romans, Saxons, Danes, and Normans
      So was he brought forth unto the green, before the Chappell within the Tower, and his head laide downe upon a long logge of timber, and there strucke off, and afterward his body with the head, was enterred at Windsor, beside the body of King Edward.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

logge f

  1. plural of loggia

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown, but probably connected to Middle English lugge (pole), from which obsolete/dialectal English lugg, lug (pole; measure of length ~6 yd.; measure of land ~50 sq. yd.). Cf. also clogge (log), clog.

Ending on -g may suggest Scandinavian origin, which has been proposed, cf. Old Norse lág and its regular reflex Norwegian Nynorsk låg (fallen tree), but the Old Norse/Middle Norwegian vowel is long while ME vowel is short.

Discounting 13th-century surname Log, first attested as Medieval Latin loggiandum (woodcutting) in 1205 (in Rotuli litterarum clausarum), then Medieval Latin loggum (piece of wood) in 1306 (in Muniments of Dean and Chapter of Canterbury), while in actual ME attested only since 1398.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

logge (plural logges or loggis or loggys)

  1. large long stick, staff, pole, log
    • 1398, Bartholomeus Anglicus's De Proprietatibus Rerum translated by John Trevisa
      He bloweþ and bereþ blosseme wiþoute undersettyng, but þe fruyt þerof fayleþ and roteþ but he be rered up fro þe grounde and ytrayled wiþ loggis and ȝerdis as it were a vyne.
      …fine appodiatione florere potest, sed fructus eius vix proficit, imo deficit vel putrescit, quando ad modum vineae a terra non erigitur, et lignis vel virgulis non sustentatur.
      It blew and blossomed without undersettings, but its fruits failed and rotted, so supports are needed anyway to raise them from the ground and uphold with staffs and rods, as if it were a vine.
      And þe olyve wol nouȝt be harde ybete wiþ staves and logges to gadre þe fruyt þerof, as some men doon þat ben unredy and unwyse…
      …nec vult olea percuti graviter cum perticis pro suo fructu colligendo, sicut faciunt aliqui minus cauti…
      And the olive is not to be hard-beaten with staves and poles to gather its fruits, as some men who have done that were unready and unwise…
    • 1448, Churchwardens' Accounts of the Parish of St. Mary
      Item, we have payde for raftur loggys and a post VII d. ob. … we have payde for hewying of yem … II d.
      Moreover, we have paid for rafter logs and a wooden post 7½ pence … we have paid for hewing them … 2 pence

References[edit]