lagu

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Dena'ina[edit]

Particle[edit]

lagu

  1. I wonder

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit लघु (laghu, gentle).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈlaɡu]
  • Hyphenation: la‧gu

Noun[edit]

lagu (plural, first-person possessive laguku, second-person possessive lagumu, third-person possessive lagunya)

  1. song
    Synonym: gita
  2. rhythm, tone
  3. behavior

Derived terms[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese lago. Cognate with Guinea-Bissau Creole lagua.

Noun[edit]

lagu

  1. lake

Kapampangan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Philippine *laguq

Noun[edit]

lagu

  1. beauty

Kedah Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit लघु (laghu, gentle)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lagu

  1. song (used in other states as well)
    Hangpa nak biaq aku ghenggah soghang-soghang ja ka; lagu ni syok gak ni, mai nyanyi sama!
    Are you going to let me do all the singing; this song is quite good, come sing along!

Adverb[edit]

lagu

  1. (in that/this) Way, manner, like (that/this)
    Huduh ngat aih hangpa dok jelan lidah lagu tu, seghupa ngan hantu pa aih!
    It is so ugly that you stick out your tongue like that, you looked like a ghost!

Derived terms[edit]

It is usually used as compound words as following:

  • lagu mana (how)
  • lagu tu (like that)
  • lagu ni (like this)
  • lagu dia (like him)
  • lagu Ahmad (like Ahmad)

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit लघु (laghu, gentle).

Noun[edit]

lagu

  1. song

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɑ.ɡu/, [ˈlɑ.ɣu]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laguz (water, sea), from Proto-Indo-European *lakw- (lake, pond). Cognate with Latin lacus (hollow, pond), Old Irish loch (lake, pond), Ancient Greek λάκκος (lákkos, waterhole, pond, pit).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lagu m

  1. sea, water, lake
  2. the runic character (/l/)
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: lai, laie, leye, laȝe, lawe

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed (ca. 1000 C.E.) from Old Norse lǫg (the things that are laid down, the laws), originally a neuter plural but reanalysed as a feminine singular when it was borrowed into Old English. From the singular Proto-Germanic *lagą (something laid), from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-, the root of English lie, lay.

The Old Icelandic word means "something laid down or fixed", both in the literal sense of "layer, stratum" and in the figurative "agreed share", "fixed price", "partnership", etc. The plural had the collective sense of "[body of] law". The native Old English word replaced by the Old Norse loan was ǣ.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lagu f

  1. law, ordinance, rule, regulation; right, legal privilege
    lahbryċebreach of law
    lahċēappayment for the restoration of legal rights
    lahwitalawyer, attorney
    lahslitefine, penalty for breaking the law
Usage notes[edit]
  • In compounds, the form lah- is frequently encountered, with normal Late West Saxon fricative devoicing in syllable-final position.
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Sardinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lacus (lake). Compare Aragonese laco, Catalan llac, Esperanto lago, French lac, Italian lago, Maltese lag, Portuguese lago, Romanian lac, Spanish lago.

Noun[edit]

lagu m

  1. lake