eft

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See also: EFT and eft-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛft/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛft

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English evete, from Old English efeta, of unknown origin.

Noun[edit]

eft (plural efts)

  1. A newt, especially the European smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris, syn. Triturus punctatus).
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.10:
      Only these marishes and myrie bogs, / In which the fearefull ewftes do build their bowres, / Yeeld me an hostry mongst the croking frogs […].
    • 1844, Robert Browning, "Garden Fancies," II. Sibrandus Schafnaburgennis:
      How did he like it when the live creatures
      Tickled and toused and browsed him all over,
      And worm, slug, eft, with serious features
      Came in, each one, for his right of trover?
Usage notes[edit]

The term red eft is used for the land-dwelling juvenile stage of the Eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens).

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English eft, from Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Compare after, aft.

Adverb[edit]

eft (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Again; afterwards
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian eft, Old Saxon eft, Old Norse ept.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

eft

  1. again
    Hē ātēah eft his sweord, and eft hit līehte on þīestrum þurh hit self.
    He took out his sword again, and again it flashed in the dark by itself.
  2. back (of return or reversal)
    Ne wēndon wē þīn eft swā hraðe!
    We didn't expect you back so soon!
    Iċ wȳsċe þæt iċ meahte eft niman þæt iċ cwæþ.
    I wish I could take back what I said.
    Mīn frēond āġeaf mē eft þā bōc þe iċ hire lāh.
    My friend gave me back the book that I lent her.
    Ġif man lange staraþ on þā neowolnesse, staraþ sēo neowolnes eft on hine.
    If you gaze too long into the abyss, the abyss stares back into you.
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "Saint Maur, Abbot"
      Þā ēode sē prēost eft tō his weorce.
      Then the priest went back to his work.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Matthew 26:52
      Þā cwæþ sē Hǣlend tō him, "Dō þīn sweord eft on his sċēaðe."
      Then Jesus said to him, "Put your sword back in its sheath."
  3. afterwards

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian eft, Old English eft, Old Norse ept.

Adverb[edit]

eft

  1. afterwards, again

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English evete, from Old English efete.

Noun[edit]

eft

  1. newt

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith