fet

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: FET, Fet, and fèt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɛt/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fetten, feten, from Old English fetian, fatian (to bring, fetch), probably a conflation of Proto-Germanic *fetaną (to go), from Proto-Indo-European *ped- (to walk, stumble, fall); and Proto-Germanic *fatōną (to hold, seize), also from Proto-Indo-European *ped-. Cognate with Dutch vatten (to catch, grab), German fassen (to lay hold of, seize, take, hold). Compare also Icelandic feta (to find one's way). More at fetch.

Verb[edit]

fet (third-person singular simple present fets, present participle fetting, simple past and past participle fet)

  1. (obsolete) to fetch

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare feat, French fait, and Italian fetta (slice), German Fetzen (rag).

Noun[edit]

fet (plural fets)

  1. (obsolete) a piece
    • (Can we date this quote by Michael Drayton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The bottom clear,
      Now laid with many a fet
      Of seed pearl.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

fet (plural not attested)

  1. (BDSM, slang) Clipping of fetish.
    • 1997, "NuBabyByte", Iron Shackles, Bare Feet (on newsgroup alt.torture)
      oh, btw...when you consider the fet-clothing available out there, realize how many have a collar attached.
    • 2003, "Morgane", Relatives turning up in the scene (on newsgroup soc.subculture.bondage-bdsm)
      It was 'Lingerie Night' at a local fet club a few years ago.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for fet in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin fētō. Compare Daco-Romanian făta.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fet (past participle fitatã)

  1. (of mammals) give birth, foal, litter, calve

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin fētus. Compare Daco-Romanian făt.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fet m (plural fets)

  1. young child, boy

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin factum. Compare Old French fet, Modern French fait

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fet m (plural fets)

  1. fact

Verb[edit]

fet m (feminine feda, masculine plural fets, feminine plural fedes)

  1. past participle of fer

Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of föri + met

Contraction[edit]

fet

  1. what is someone doing?
    Ka fet?What are you doing?

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fetą, from Proto-Indo-European *pedóm, from *ped-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fet n (genitive singular fets, nominative plural fet)

  1. step
  2. (historical) a unit of measure equivalent to half an alin, or 3 lófar
  3. foot (unit of measure equivalent to 12 inches)

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse feitr

Adjective[edit]

fet (neuter singular fett, definite singular and plural fete, comparative fetere, indefinite superlative fetest, definite superlative feteste)

  1. fat
  2. fatty (especially food)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fēt

  1. plural of fōt

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: fet, feet

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin factus.

Verb[edit]

fet

  1. past participle of fere
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fere

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin factum.

Noun[edit]

fet m (oblique plural fez or fetz, nominative singular fez or fetz, nominative plural fet)

  1. act; action
  2. fact

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *wintos (wind), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fet f (genitive fite or feite, nominative plural feta)

  1. whistling, hissing, the sound of a sword cleaving the air
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 3a7
      is cosmart do rétaib ind ḟet
      the whistling is a signal by things
  2. (musical intrument) pipe

Inflection[edit]

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative fetL fitL fetaH
Vocative fetL fitL fetaH
Accusative fitN fitL fetaH
Genitive fiteH fetL fetN
Dative fitL fetaib fetaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative fetL feitL fetaH
Vocative fetL feitL fetaH
Accusative feitN feitL fetaH
Genitive feiteH fetL fetN
Dative feitL fetaib fetaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fet ḟet fet
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish fēter, from Old Norse feitr, from Proto-Germanic *faitaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fet (comparative fetare, superlative fetast)

  1. fat, obese (about people or animals)
    Fetare gubbe har jag nog aldrig sett tidigare.I don't think I've seen such a fat guy before.
  2. containing much fat (about food)
  3. being especially fertile, profitable or lucrative; (slang) good, extraordinary, phat (a general intensifier, usually positive)
    Du missade en riktigt fet chans.You missed quite a good opportunity.
    Shit, vilken fet bil du har köpt!Damn, what a nice/cool/phat car you've bought!

Derived terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of fet
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular fet fetare fetast
Neuter singular fett fetare fetast
Plural feta fetare fetast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 fete fetare fetaste
All feta fetare fetaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fet, from Proto-Germanic *fetą.

Noun[edit]

fet n

  1. footstep, step

Related terms[edit]