fere

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See also: fêre

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From (Northumbrian) Old English fǣra, aphetic form of ġefēra (whence also Middle English y-fere).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fere (plural feres)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) A companion, comrade or friend.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book V:
      they swange oute their swerdis and slowe of noble men of armys mo than an hondred – and than they rode ayen to theire ferys.
  2. (archaic) A person's spouse, or an animal's mate.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book IV, canto III, stanza 52:
      And Cambel tooke Cambrina to his fere.
    • 1830, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, ‘Supposed Confessions of a Second-Rate Sensitive Mind’:
      The lamb rejoiceth in the year, / And raceth freely with his fere, / And answers to his mother’s calls / From the flower’d furrow.
    • 1864, George MacDonald, The Old Nurse's Story
      What if my Duncan be the youth whom his wicked brother hurled into the ravine, come again in a new body, to live out his life on the earth, cut short by his brother’s hatred? If so, his persecution of you, and of your mother for your sake, is easy to understand. And if so, you will never be able to rest till you find your fere, wherever she may have been born on the face of the earth.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Latin ferus (wild).

Adjective[edit]

fere (comparative more fere, superlative most fere)

  1. (obsolete) Fierce.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

fere

  1. Alternative form of fãrã.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dʰer-o- (tight, close by), a derivative of *dʰer- (to hold). Cognates include firmus.

Adverb[edit]

ferē (not comparable)

  1. nearly, almost, well-nigh, within a little, for the most part, about.
    Synonyms: fermē, prope, paene, iū̆xtā
  2. Closely, quite, entirely, fully, altogether, just.
  3. In general, generally, usually, commonly, for most of the time.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From for.

Verb[edit]

fēre

  1. second-person singular present active subjunctive of for

References[edit]

  • fere”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • fere”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fere in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
    • (ambiguous) synonyms: vocabula idem fere declarantia
    • (ambiguous) to talk of a subject which was then the common topic of conversation: in eum sermonem incidere, qui tum fere multis erat in ore
    • (ambiguous) as usually happens: ut fit, ita ut fit, ut fere fit
    • (ambiguous) he spoke (very much) as follows: haec (fere) dixit
    • (ambiguous) this is very much what Cicero said: haec Ciceronis fere

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English fǣr, from Proto-West Germanic *fāru, from Proto-Germanic *fērō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fere (uncountable)

  1. fear
Alternative forms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: fear
  • Yola: vear, ferde

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English feorh, from Proto-West Germanic *ferh, from Proto-Germanic *ferhuz.

Noun[edit]

fere (uncountable)

  1. life

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

fere

  1. (Sark) to iron

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin faciō, facere.

Verb[edit]

fere

  1. Alternative form of faire

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

fere

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of ferir
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of ferir

Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fere (Jawi فيري‎)

  1. (intransitive) to ascend
  2. (intransitive, transitive) to climb
  3. (intransitive, of the Sultan's palace) to go, go to, enter
    ana ifere toma kadatothey entered into the palace

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of fere
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st tofere fofere mifere
2nd nofere nifere
3rd Human oferem, moferef ifere, yofere
Non-human ifere ifere, yofere
* m - masculine, f - feminine, - archaic

References[edit]

  • Frederik Sigismund Alexander de Clercq (1890) Bijdragen tot de kennis der Residentie Ternate, E.J. Brill
  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Yoruba[edit]

Fèrè (1)
Fèrè tó ń léfòó lójú omi (3)

Etymology[edit]

Cognates include Nupe fèrè

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fèrè

  1. (music) flute; small type of whistle
  2. (soccer) whistle
  3. balloon
    Synonym: bààlúù

Derived terms[edit]