fere

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English (Northumbrian) fǣra, aphetic form of ġefēra ( > Middle English y-fere).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fere ‎(plural feres)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) A companion, comrade or friend.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book V:
      they swange oute their swerdis and slowe of noble men of armys mo than an hondred – and than they rode ayen to theire ferys.
  2. (archaic) A spouse; an animal's mate.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Latin ferus ‎(wild).

Adjective[edit]

fere ‎(comparative more fere, superlative most fere)

  1. (obsolete) fierce

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dʰer-o- ‎(tight, close by), a derivative of *dʰer- ‎(to hold), whence also firmus, fermē.

Adverb[edit]

ferē (not comparable)

  1. Closely, quite, entirely, fully, altogether, just.
  2. In general, generally, usually, commonly, for most of the time.

Etymology 2[edit]

From for.

Verb[edit]

fēre

  1. second-person singular present active subjunctive of for

References[edit]

  • fere in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fere in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fere” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
    • (ambiguous) synonyms: vocabula idem fere declarantia
    • (ambiguous) to talk of a subject which was then the common topic of conversation: in eum sermonem incidere, qui tum fere multis erat in ore
    • (ambiguous) as usually happens: ut fit, ita ut fit, ut fere fit
    • (ambiguous) he spoke (very much) as follows: haec (fere) dixit
    • (ambiguous) this is very much what Cicero said: haec Ciceronis fere

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Verb[edit]

fere

  1. (Sark) to iron

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin faciō, facere.

Verb[edit]

fere

  1. Alternative form of faire

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

fere

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ferir
  2. second-person singular imperative of ferir