font

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See also: fönt and főnt

English[edit]

holy water font

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɒnt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒnt
  • (US) IPA(key): /fɑnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English font, an early borrowing from Latin fōns, fontis (fountain).

Noun[edit]

font (plural fonts)

  1. (Christianity) A receptacle in a church for holy water, especially one used in baptism.
    Synonym: stoup
    Hyponym: baptismal font
    • 1791, Christopher Smart, “Moderation”, in Hymns for the Amusement of Children:
      Blessed be God, that, at the font, /⁠ My sponsors bound me to the call / Of Christ in England to confront / The world, the flesh, the fiend and all.
    • 1913, John Bertram Peterson, “Baptismal Font”, in Catholic Encyclopedia, volume 2:
      In the Apostolic Age, as in Jewish times (John, iii, 23), baptism was administered without special fonts, at the seaside or in streams or pools of water (Acts, viii, 38); []
  2. A receptacle for oil in a lamp.
  3. (figuratively) Spring, source, fountain.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French fonte, feminine past participle of verb fondre (to melt).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

font (plural fonts)

  1. (typography) A set of glyphs of unified design, belonging to one typeface (e.g., Helvetica), style (e.g., italic), and weight (e.g., bold). Usually representing the letters of an alphabet and its supplementary characters.
    1. In metal typesetting, a set of type sorts in one size.
    2. In phototypesetting, a set of patterns forming glyphs of any size, or the film they are stored on.
    3. In digital typesetting, a set of glyphs in a single style, representing one or more alphabets or writing systems, or the computer code representing it.
  2. (computing) A computer file containing the code used to draw and compose the glyphs of one or more typographic fonts on a computer display or printer.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

font (third-person singular simple present fonts, present participle fonting, simple past and past participle fonted)

  1. (television, colloquial, transitive) To overlay (text) on the picture.
    • 1981, William Safire, On language (page 78)
      When figures or quotes are thought helpful to understanding a spot, they're "fonted" over the cover picture.
    • 1987, The Foundation Center, Promoting issues & ideas: a guide to public relations for nonprofit organizations (page 97)
      [] character generator instead of an easel card to create letters on camera or telephone numbers that can run across the TV screen. The process is called fonting.

References[edit]

  • “font” in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • Bringhurst, Robert (2002). The Elements of Typographic Style, version 2.5, pp 291–2. Vancouver, Hartley & Marks. →ISBN.

Etymology 3[edit]

Apparently from fount, with influence from the senses above (under etymology 1).

Noun[edit]

font (plural fonts)

  1. (figuratively) A source, wellspring, fount.
    • 1824George Gordon, Lord Byron, Don Juan, canto V
      A gaudy taste; for they are little skill'd in
      The arts of which these lands were once the font
    • 1910Arthur Edward Waite, The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, part II
      As I am not drawing here on the font of imagination to refresh that of fact and experience, I do not suggest that the Tarot set the example of expressing Secret Doctrine in pictures and that it was followed by Hermetic writers; but it is noticeable that it is perhaps the earliest example of this art.
    • 1915Woodrow Wilson, Third State of the Union Address
      I am interested to fix your attention on this prospect now because unless you take it within your view and permit the full significance of it to command your thought I cannot find the right light in which to set forth the particular matter that lies at the very font of my whole thought as I address you to-day.
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan font, from Latin fons, fontem, of Proto-Indo-European origin.

Noun[edit]

font m (plural fonts)

  1. fountain
  2. source (of water)
  3. source (origin)
  4. (journalism) source

Synonyms[edit]

(fountain): fontana

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

font

  1. third-person plural present indicative of faire

Friulian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fundus.

Noun[edit]

font m (plural fonts)

  1. bottom
  2. background
  3. landed property, farm
  4. fund

Related terms[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Pfund, from Latin pondo.[1]

Noun[edit]

font (plural fontok)

  1. pound (weight)
  2. pound (currency unit)
    Synonym: font sterling
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative font fontok
accusative fontot fontokat
dative fontnak fontoknak
instrumental fonttal fontokkal
causal-final fontért fontokért
translative fonttá fontokká
terminative fontig fontokig
essive-formal fontként fontokként
essive-modal
inessive fontban fontokban
superessive fonton fontokon
adessive fontnál fontoknál
illative fontba fontokba
sublative fontra fontokra
allative fonthoz fontokhoz
elative fontból fontokból
delative fontról fontokról
ablative fonttól fontoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fonté fontoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fontéi fontokéi
Possessive forms of font
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. fontom fontjaim
2nd person sing. fontod fontjaid
3rd person sing. fontja fontjai
1st person plural fontunk fontjaink
2nd person plural fontotok fontjaitok
3rd person plural fontjuk fontjaik
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English font, from Middle French fonte, feminine past participle of fondre (to melt), from Latin fundō (I melt).[1]

Noun[edit]

font (plural fontok)

  1. (typography) digital font (set of glyphs of unified design contained in a computer file)
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative font fontok
accusative fontot fontokat
dative fontnak fontoknak
instrumental fonttal fontokkal
causal-final fontért fontokért
translative fonttá fontokká
terminative fontig fontokig
essive-formal fontként fontokként
essive-modal
inessive fontban fontokban
superessive fonton fontokon
adessive fontnál fontoknál
illative fontba fontokba
sublative fontra fontokra
allative fonthoz fontokhoz
elative fontból fontokból
delative fontról fontokról
ablative fonttól fontoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fonté fontoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fontéi fontokéi
Possessive forms of font
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. fontom fontjaim
2nd person sing. fontod fontjaid
3rd person sing. fontja fontjai
1st person plural fontunk fontjaink
2nd person plural fontotok fontjaitok
3rd person plural fontjuk fontjaik

Etymology 3[edit]

From the verb fon +‎ -t.

Verb[edit]

font

  1. third-person singular indicative past indefinite of fon

Participle[edit]

font

  1. past participle of fon
    Synonym: fonott (in certain senses)
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative font fontak
accusative fontat fontakat
dative fontnak fontaknak
instrumental fonttal fontakkal
causal-final fontért fontakért
translative fonttá fontakká
terminative fontig fontakig
essive-formal fontként fontakként
essive-modal
inessive fontban fontakban
superessive fonton fontakon
adessive fontnál fontaknál
illative fontba fontakba
sublative fontra fontakra
allative fonthoz fontakhoz
elative fontból fontakból
delative fontról fontakról
ablative fonttól fontaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fonté fontaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fontéi fontakéi

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fons, via Old Norse fontr (sense 1), and French fonte, via English font (sense 2)

Noun[edit]

font m (definite singular fonten, indefinite plural fonter, definite plural fontene)

  1. a baptismal font
  2. (typography) font, or fount (UK)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fons, via Old Norse fontr (sense 1), and French fonte, via English font (sense 2)

Noun[edit]

font m (definite singular fonten, indefinite plural fontar, definite plural fontane)

  1. a baptismal font
  2. (typography) font, or fount (UK)

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English font, from Middle French fonte, feminine past participle of verb fondre (to melt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

font m inan

  1. (computing) font (computer file containing the code used to draw and compose the glyphs)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • font in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • font in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

font c

  1. (typography) a font

Usage notes[edit]

Declension[edit]

Declension of font 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative font fonten fonter fonterna
Genitive fonts fontens fonters fonternas

Synonyms[edit]