ferme

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See also: fermé, fèrme, and fermë

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

ferme ‎(plural fermes)

  1. (cant) Hole.

References[edit]

  • OED2
  • 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French ferm, ferme ‎(solid), from Latin firmus ‎(solid, secure), from Proto-Indo-European *dher(ə)-, *dhrē- ‎(to hold).

Adjective[edit]

ferme (masculine and feminine, plural fermes)

  1. firm
Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ferme f ‎(plural fermes)

  1. (carpentry) roof truss

Verb[edit]

ferme

  1. first-person singular indicative present form of fermer
  2. third-person singular indicative present form of fermer
  3. first-person singular subjunctive present form of fermer
  4. third-person singular subjunctive present form of fermer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fermer

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French ferme ‎(farm, farm buildings), from Old French ferme ‎(lease for working, rent, farm), from Medieval Latin ferma, firma ‎(rent, tax, tribute, farm), from Old English feorm ‎(rent, provision, supplies, feast), from Proto-Germanic *firmō, *firhuma- ‎(means of living, subsistence), from Proto-Germanic *firhu- ‎(life force, body, being), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷ- ‎(life, force, strength, tree). Related to Old English feorh ‎(life, spirit), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌹𐍂𐍈𐌿𐍃 ‎(fairƕus, the world). Compare also Old English feormehām ‎(farm), feormere ‎(purveyor).

Noun[edit]

ferme f ‎(plural fermes)

  1. farm
Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ferme

  1. feminine plural of fermo

Noun[edit]

ferme f pl

  1. plural of ferma

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From *ferimē, earlier superlative of ferē, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer- ‎(to hold), whence also firmus.

Adverb[edit]

fermē (not comparable)

  1. Closely, quite, entirely, fully, altogether, just.
  2. In general, generally, usually, commonly, for most of the time.

References[edit]

  • ferme” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French ferm, ferme ‎(solid), from Latin firmus ‎(solid, secure), from Proto-Indo-European *dher(ə)-, *dhrē- ‎(to hold).

Adjective[edit]

ferme m, f (plural fermes)

  1. firm

Novial[edit]

Noun[edit]

ferme ‎(plural fermes)

  1. farm

Old French[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Medieval Latin ferma, firma ‎(rent, tax, tribute, farm), from Old English feorm ‎(rent, provision, supplies, feast), from Proto-Germanic *firmō, *firhuma- ‎(means of living, subsistence), from Proto-Germanic *firhu- ‎(life force, body, being), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷ- ‎(life, force, strength, tree).

Noun[edit]

ferme f ‎(oblique plural fermes, nominative singular ferme, nominative plural fermes)

  1. lease (letting agreement)
  2. the land leased
  3. farm

Adjective[edit]

ferme f

  1. oblique feminine singular of ferm
  2. nominative feminine singular of ferm