flute

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See also: flûte and flûté

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

A side-blown flute (noun sense 1).
A recorder, sometimes also called a flute (noun sense 2).
Champagne in a classic flute (noun sense 3).
Baguettes or flutes (noun sense 6).
  • enPR: floo͞t, IPA(key): /fluːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fleute, floute, flote, from Old French flaute, from Provençal flaut, of uncertain origin. Perhaps ultimately from three possibilities:

Doublet of flauta and fluyt.

Noun[edit]

flute (plural flutes)

  1. A woodwind instrument consisting of a tube with a row of holes that produce sound through vibrations caused by air blown across the edge of the holes, often tuned by plugging one or more holes with a finger; the Western concert flute, a transverse side-blown flute of European origin.
  2. (colloquial) A recorder, also a woodwind instrument.
  3. A glass with a long, narrow bowl and a long stem, used for drinking wine, especially champagne.
  4. A lengthwise groove, such as one of the lengthwise grooves on a classical column, or a groove on a cutting tool (such as a drill bit, endmill, or reamer), which helps to form both a cutting edge and a channel through which chips can escape
  5. (architecture, firearms) A semicylindrical vertical groove, as in a pillar, in plaited cloth, or in a rifle barrel to cut down the weight.
  6. A long French bread roll, baguette[1].
  7. An organ stop with a flute-like sound.
  8. A shuttle in weaving tapestry etc.
Synonyms[edit]
Meronyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Irish: fliúit
  • Welsh: ffliwt
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
References[edit]
  1. ^ 1858, Peter Lund Simmonds, The Dictionary of Trade Products

Verb[edit]

fluted pillars

flute (third-person singular simple present flutes, present participle fluting, simple past and past participle fluted)

  1. (intransitive) To play on a flute.
  2. (intransitive) To make a flutelike sound.
    • 1895, S. R. Crockett, A Cry Across the Black Water
      The green turf was velvet underfoot. The blackbirds fluted in the hazels there.
  3. (transitive) To utter with a flutelike sound.
  4. (transitive) To form flutes or channels in (as in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare French flûte (a transport)?, Dutch fluit.

Noun[edit]

flute (plural flutes)

  1. A kind of flyboat; a storeship.

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flute f (plural flutes)

  1. Post-1990 spelling of flûte.

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

flute

  1. inflection of fluten:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From flûte, from French flûte, from Old French fleüte, from Old Occitan flaut.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈflut/
  • Rhymes: -ut
  • Hyphenation: flùte

Noun[edit]

flute m (invariable)

  1. flute (type of glass)
    Synonyms: flûte, fluttino