recorder

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English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English recordour, borrowed from Old French recordour, from Old French recordeor, from Medieval Latin recordātor, from Latin recordor (call to mind, remember, recollect), from re- (back, again) + cor (heart; mind).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)də(ɹ)

Noun[edit]

recorder (plural recorders)

  1. An apparatus for recording; a device which records.
  2. Agent noun of record; one who records.
  3. A judge in a municipal court.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English recorder, from record (to practice (music)).

A baroque alto recorder

Noun[edit]

recorder (plural recorders)

  1. (music) A musical instrument of the woodwind family; a type of fipple flute, a simple internal duct flute.
    Recorders are made in various sizes, from the high soprano or descant recorder to the low bass recorder.
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act V, Scene 1,[1]
      Indeed he hath played on his prologue like a child on a recorder; a sound, but not in government.
    • 1791, William Cowper (translator), The Iliad of Homer, London: J. Johnson, Book 10, lines 12-14, p. 242, [2]
      [] he beheld
      The city fronted with bright fires, and heard
      Pipes, and recorders, and the hum of war;
    • 1861, Charles Dickens, Great Expectations, London: Chapman and Hall, Volume 2, Chapter 12, p. 201,[3]
      On his [Hamlet’s] taking the recorders—very like a little black flute that had just been played in the orchestra and handed out at the door—he was called upon unanimously for Rule Britannia.
    • 1982, Anne Tyler, Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant, New York: Knopf, Chapter 5, p. 133,[4]
      And when they paused on a hilltop for lunch, he whipped out his battered recorder and commenced to tootling “Greensleeves,” scaring off all living creatures within a five-mile radius—which may have been his intention.
    • 2017, Daniel Mendelsohn, An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic, New York: Penguin Random House,[5]
      [] he had huffed into his white plastic recorder while scowling at the sheets of music that lay open on the wobbly stainless-steel stand.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French recorder, from Old French recorder, from Vulgar Latin recordāre, alternative form of Latin recordārī, present active infinitive of recordor (call to mind, remember, recollect), from re- (back, again) + cor (heart; mind).

Verb[edit]

recorder

  1. to say something repetitively in order to learn.
    As-tu recordé ta leçon?
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

re- +‎ corder.

Verb[edit]

recorder

  1. to restring

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

recorder

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of recordor

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French recorder.

Verb[edit]

recorder

  1. to record; to register; to make a record (of)
    recorder une histoire
    to make a record of a story

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

  • French: recorder

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin recordāre, from Latin recordārī, present active infinitive of recordor.

Verb[edit]

recorder

  1. to record; to register
  2. to recall; to remember

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-d, *-ds, *-dt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]