stria

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin stria (furrow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stria (plural striae or striæ)

  1. A stripe, usually one of a set of parallel stripes
  2. (architecture) One of the fillets between the flutes of columns, etc.
  3. A stretch mark

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Emilian[edit]

Emiliano-Romagnolo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eml

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin strīga.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: stri‧a

Noun[edit]

stria f (plural strii) (Mirandola)

  1. witch, hag

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

stria

  1. third-person singular past historic of strier

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stria.

Noun[edit]

stria f (plural strie)

  1. (pathology) stria
  2. (architecture) stria, channel
  3. streak, stria

Verb[edit]

stria

  1. inflection of striare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *strig-jā, from what looks like a cross of Proto-Indo-European *streyg- (to brush, strip, shear) and Proto-Indo-European *strengʰ- (to draw, tie). Cognate to Latin striga, Latin stringō, English streak, German strieme (streak, stripe), Old High German strimo, Dutch striem.

Noun[edit]

stria f (genitive striae); first declension

  1. A furrow, channel, groove, hollow.
    1. (architecture) The flute of a column.
    2. A fold of drapery, pleat.
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative stria striae
Genitive striae striārum
Dative striae striīs
Accusative striam striās
Ablative striā striīs
Vocative stria striae
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Italian: stria, striscia (+ fascia)
  • English: stria
  • Spanish: estria
  • Portuguese: estria

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

stria f (genitive striae); first declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) Alternative form of strīga (witch)
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative stria striae
Genitive striae striārum
Dative striae striīs
Accusative striam striās
Ablative striā striīs
Vocative stria striae

References[edit]

  • stria in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stria in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • stria in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Ligurian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin striga

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stria f (plural strie)

  1. witch

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin strīga, from strīx, from Ancient Greek στρίγξ (strínx).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stria f (plural strie)

  1. witch

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French strier.

Verb[edit]

a stria (third-person singular present striează, past participle striat1st conj.

  1. to streak, to stripe

Conjugation[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stria f (plural strie)

  1. Alternative form of striga