striga

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See also: Striga, strigã, strigă, and štriga

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin striga (a furrow)

Noun[edit]

striga (plural strigae)

  1. (botany) A sharp bristle or hair-like scale.
  2. A stripe or stria.
  3. (architecture) The flute of a column.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

striga

  1. inflection of strigare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek στρίξ (stríx, screecher), which also gave strī̆x (screech owl; witch).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈstriː.ɡa/, [ˈs̠t̪riːɡä] or IPA(key): /ˈstri.ɡa/, [ˈs̠t̪rɪɡä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈstri.ɡa/, [ˈst̪riːɡä]
  • Note: on Romance evidence, the length of the vowel varied.

Noun[edit]

strī̆ga f (genitive strī̆gae); first declension

  1. A female evil spirit, nocturnal apparition; a nightmare.
    Synonyms: incubus, ephialtēs
    1. A vampire.
      Synonym: vampȳrus
    2. A witch, hag.
      Synonyms: volātica, malefica, venēfica, strī̆x
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative strī̆ga strī̆gae
Genitive strī̆gae strī̆gārum
Dative strī̆gae strī̆gīs
Accusative strī̆gam strī̆gās
Ablative strī̆gā strī̆gīs
Vocative strī̆ga strī̆gae
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Italic *strigā, from what looks like a cross of Proto-Indo-European *streyg- (to brush, strip, shear) and Proto-Indo-European *strengʰ- (to draw, tie).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

striga f (genitive strigae); first declension

  1. A strip, row, line.
    1. (agriculture) A windrow.
  2. (surveying) A strip of ground longer than broad.
    Antonym: scamnum
    1. (military) A side-avenue in camp.
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative striga strigae
Genitive strigae strigārum
Dative strigae strigīs
Accusative strigam strigās
Ablative strigā strigīs
Vocative striga strigae
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  • striga” on page 2015 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “stringō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 591
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “striga”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German)

Further reading[edit]


Romagnol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin strĭga(m) (witch), accusative of Latin strĭga (witch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

striga f (plural strig)

  1. witch
    La pêr una striga!
    She looks like a witch!

References[edit]

  • Masotti, Adelmo (1999) Vocabolario Romagnolo Italiano (in Italian), Zanichelli, page 630

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin root *strigāre from Latin strix (screech owl).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /striˈɡa/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

a striga (third-person singular present strigă, past participle strigat1st conj.

  1. to call
  2. to shout, yell, scream

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

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Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Romanian strigă, from Latin strīga.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstri.ɡa/
  • Hyphenation: stri‧ga

Noun[edit]

striga f (genitive singular strigy, nominative plural strigy, genitive plural stríg, declension pattern of žena)

  1. witch
  2. demon

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • striga in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin striga (evil spirit, compare Friulian strie, Italian strega, Ligurian stria, Lombard stria, and also Romanian strigă), from strīx, from Ancient Greek στρίγξ (strínx).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

striga f (plural strighe)

  1. witch, sorceress (female who uses magic)

Related terms[edit]