fera

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See also: Fera, FERA, fêra, and -fera

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin fera.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fera f (plural feres)

  1. wild animal, beast

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fera

  1. feminine singular of fer (wild, untamed)

Further reading[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): [ˈfera]
  • Rhymes: -era
  • Hyphenation: fer‧a

Adjective[edit]

fera (accusative singular feran, plural feraj, accusative plural ferajn)

  1. iron (attributive)

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fera

  1. third-person singular future of faire
    Demain il fera beau.
    Tomorrow it will be lovely. (the weather)

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fēra

  1. Romanization of 𐍆𐌴𐍂𐌰

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fera

  1. Rōmaji transcription of フェラ

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Nominalization of the feminine forms of ferus. For the gender, perhaps compare the semantically similar bēstia f, bēlua f, and pecus f.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fera f (genitive ferae); first declension

  1. wild animal, beast

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fera ferae
Genitive ferae ferārum
Dative ferae ferīs
Accusative feram ferās
Ablative ferā ferīs
Vocative fera ferae

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: fera
  • Italian: fiera
  • Portuguese: fera
  • Romanian: fiară
  • Spanish: fiera

References[edit]

  • fera”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fera”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fera in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fera in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to civilise men, a nation: homines, gentem a fera agrestique vita ad humanum cultum civilemque deducere (De Or. 1. 8. 33)

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian ferire, from Latin ferire.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fera (imperfect jferi, past participle ferit)

  1. to injure, wound
    Synonyms: darab, ġeraħ

Conjugation[edit]

    Conjugation of fera
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m ferejt ferejt fera ferejna ferejtu ferew
f feriet
imperfect m nferi tferi jferi nferu tferu jferu
f tferi
imperative feri feru

Related terms[edit]

Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fera f

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fera, from ferus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɛɾɐ
  • Hyphenation: fe‧ra

Noun[edit]

fera f (plural feras)

  1. beast (non-human animal)
    Synonyms: besta, bicho, criatura
  2. (Brazil, figurative) beast (violent person)

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fera m or f (plural feras)

  1. (Brazil, colloquial) skillful person
  2. (Pernambuco, colloquial) freshman
    Synonyms: caloiro, bicho

Adjective[edit]

fera m or f (plural feras)

  1. (Brazil, colloquial) skillful

Adjective[edit]

fera

  1. feminine singular of fero

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:fera.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Tetum[edit]

Verb[edit]

fera

  1. to split
  2. to crack, to burst open