bestia

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See also: Bestia, bèstia, bestią, and bestía

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

bestia f (plural bestias)

  1. beast

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

bes- +‎ tia

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bestia f (plural besties)

  1. great-aunt

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin bēstia. Cognate to biscia, which is not borrowed but inherited.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bestia f (plural bestie)

  1. beast

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ bestia in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The origin is unknown. A Proto-Indo-European preform *dʰwēstiā has been proposed, from the root dʰwēs- (to breathe) (compare Gothic 𐌳𐌹𐌿𐍃 (dius) from *dʰews- (to breathe); more at English deer), but this is uncertain, since an initial f- would be expected in Latin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bēstia f (genitive bēstiae); first declension

  1. a beast

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bēstia bēstiae
Genitive bēstiae bēstiārum
Dative bēstiae bēstiīs
Accusative bēstiam bēstiās
Ablative bēstiā bēstiīs
Vocative bēstia bēstiae

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

bēstiā

  1. ablative singular of bēstia

References[edit]

  • bestia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bestia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • bestia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • bestia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • bestia in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “bestia”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 71
  • Ernout, Alfred; Meillet, Antoine (2001), “bestia”, in Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine: histoire des mots (in French), with additions and corrections of André J., 4th edition, Paris: Klincksieck, page 69b
  • Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist (1938), “bestia”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume I, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, page 102
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume I, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 269

Old Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bestia f

  1. Alternative form of besta

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese besta and Spanish bestia.

Noun[edit]

bestia

  1. beast
  2. animal

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin bēstia[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛs.tja/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

bestia f

  1. beast (non-human animal)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brückner, Aleksander (1927) Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish), Warsaw: Wiedza Powszechna, published 1985

Further reading[edit]

  • bestia in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bestia

  1. definite nominative singular of bestie
  2. definite accusative singular of bestie

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) biestg
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) bestga
  • (Puter, Vallader) bes-cha

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bēstia.

Noun[edit]

bestia f (plural bestias)

  1. (Sursilvan) animal

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) animal
  • (Sursilvan) tier

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably borrowed from Latin bēstia. Compare English beast.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbestja/, [ˈbes.t̪ja]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

bestia f (plural bestias)

  1. beast
  2. animal
  3. (derogatory) brute (person who acts stupidly)

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin bestia. Doublet of bìsa.

Noun[edit]

bestia f (plural bestie)

  1. animal
  2. beast
  3. insect