fot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: FOT, föt, and főt

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

fot

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of fotre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of fotre

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English fōt, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fot (plural feet or fot or fotes)

  1. foot (appendage used for motion and support)
  2. foot (unit for measuring length; also often used to indicate a short distance)
  3. (square) foot (unit for measuring area)
  4. The bottom, lower part or foundation of something; the foot of a flight of stairs.
  5. A leg-like support which a table or chair stands on; the foot of a table or chair.
  6. The power of using one's feet (i.e. to travel or stand up).
  7. foot (unit for measuring rhythm in poetry)
  8. (figuratively) An individual human being.
  9. The distinctive footprints left behind by a creature; an animal track.
  10. The area where the foot rests in a bed or tomb; the end of a bed of tomb.

Usage notes[edit]

By far the most common plural form is feet; fotes is relatively rare, and fot is usually only used in contexts of the unit of length.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fótr, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Noun[edit]

fot m (definite singular foten, indefinite plural føtter, definite plural føttene)

  1. (anatomy) a foot
  2. a foot (unit of measurement = 12 inches)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fótr, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds. Akin to English foot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fot m (definite singular foten, indefinite plural føter, definite plural føtene)

  1. (anatomy) a foot
  2. a foot (unit of measurement: 12 inches)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds, lengthened o-grade of *ped- (foot). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian fōt, Old Saxon fōt (Dutch voet), Old High German fuoz (German Fuß), Old Norse fótr (Danish fod, Swedish fot), Gothic 𐍆𐍉𐍄𐌿𐍃 (fōtus). The Proto-Indo-European root was also the source of Sanskrit पद् (pád), Ancient Greek πούς (poús) (genitive ποδός (podós)); Doric πῶς (pôs), Latin pēs (genitive pedis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fōt m (nominative plural fēt)

  1. (anatomy) A foot
  2. pace or tread
  3. (prosody) A foot
  4. A unit of length, especially as equal to a third of a yard

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Noun[edit]

fot m

  1. foot

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: vōt
    • Low German:
      • German Low German: Voot
        Hamburgisch: Foot
      • Westphalian:
        Ravensbergisch-Lippisch: Feot
        Westmünsterländisch: Foot
        Märkisch: Faut
    • Plautdietsch: Foot

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish fōter, from Old Norse fótr, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fot c

  1. (anatomy) a foot; the body part touching the ground while standing or walking
  2. a foot; the part of something which is in contact with the underlying surface
  3. a foot; the end opposite to the head or the top
  4. a foot (length measurement unit; with various definitions)

Declension[edit]

Declension of fot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fot foten fötter fötterna
Genitive fots fotens fötters fötternas
Declension of fot 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative fot fot
Genitive fots fots

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French forêt.

Noun[edit]

fot (plural fots)

  1. forest

Declension[edit]