ska

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See also: SKA, -ska, skA, and skå

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain. Probably imitative of the crisp guitar sound;[1] other suggestions include a contraction of “skavoovie” (a word invented and used by musician Cluett Johnson), or of “speed polka”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ska (uncountable)

  1. (music) A style of Jamaican dance music originating in the late 1950s, combining elements of Caribbean calypso and mento with American jazz and rhythm and blues; it was the precursor to rocksteady and reggae.
    • 1991, Douglas Coupland, “Eat Your Parents”, in Generation X, New York: St. Martin's Press, OCLC 22510632, page 85:
      Musical Hairsplitting: The act of classifying music and musicians into pathologically picayune categories: “The Vienna Franks are a good example of urban white acid folk revivalism crossed with ska.”
    • 2014, Heather Augustyn, “Preface”, in Ska: An Oral History, McFarland, →ISBN, page 3:
      Everyone who loves ska has their own story to tell—the first time they heard the Specials back in the '70s, the first time they danced onstage at a Toasters show in the '80s, the first time they saw the Skatalites perform in the '90s.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “ska”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From s- +‎ kam.

Verb[edit]

ska

  1. (impersonal, third person) there isn't
    ska parkimno parking
    ska përse (ska pse)you're welcome (literally, “there isn't why”)

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ska.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ska m (uncountable)

  1. (music) ska

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

ska (present tense skar, past tense skadde, past participle skadd)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2005; superseded by skade

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse skaða.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • skada (long form with a or split infinitive)
  • skade (long form with e infinitive)

Verb[edit]

ska (present tense skar, past tense skadde, past participle skadd, present participle skadande, imperative ska)

  1. (transitive) to damage, injure
  2. (transitive) to harm, inconvenience

Etymology 2[edit]

Apocopic form of skal (shall).

Verb[edit]

ska

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of skal, present tense of skulle
    • 1802, Storm, Edvard, “Sæterreiſe”, in Laurents Hallager, Norsk Ordsamling, Sebastian Popp, page 183:
      Qvar ein Dag ſka Gjæstbo væra, Māt ſka naa aat døkre Kne.
      Every day shall be a feast, food shall reach to your knees
    • c. 1700, Kolsrud, Sigurd, quoting Jacob Rasch, “Eldste nynorske bibeltekst: Jacob Rasch c. 1700”, in Syn og Segn, volume 56, published 1950, page 110:
      den ret-færigie ska værte salig a trunaa
      the just shall be saved by the faith

References[edit]

  • “ska” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • ska” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ska.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ska/
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Syllabification: ska

Noun[edit]

ska n (indeclinable)

  1. ska

Further reading[edit]

  • ska in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ska in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ska.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈska/ [ˈska], /esˈka/ [esˈka]
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Hyphenation: ska

Noun[edit]

ska m (plural skas)

  1. ska

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.


Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English ska.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ska c

  1. ska; a style of dance music

Etymology 2[edit]

Apocopic form of skall, present tense of skola, from skulu, from Proto-Germanic *skulaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ska

  1. will, be going to; denotes a promise or strong intent to perform an action in the future
    Imorgon ska vi mata tigrar
    Tomorrow, we're going to feed tigers
    Jag ska göra det imorgon. Jag lovar!
    I will do it tomorrow. I promise!
  2. shall, have to; be required to
    Nej, du ska göra det idag!
    No, you shall do it today!
  3. to be said to
    Han ska ha uppträtt hotfullt
    He is said to have behaved in a threatening manner
    Det ska tydligen regna imorgon
    Apparently, it's going to rain tomorrow (it is said to be raining tomorrow, on the weather report or the like)
  4. (with an adverbial involving movement or direction) to intend (for) to go (to/towards) (as if a (walk) or åka (drive) or följa (follow) or the like had been elided)
    Jag ska (g̶å̶/å̶k̶a̶) till affären
    I'm going to the store
    Jag ska (g̶å̶/å̶k̶a̶) hem
    I'm going home
    Jag ska (k̶l̶ä̶t̶t̶r̶a̶) upp på taket
    I'm going up on the roof
    Vi ska (g̶å̶) av vid bensinstationen
    We're getting off at the gas station
    Ska du (f̶ö̶l̶j̶a̶) med?
    Wanna join us (to some place)?
    Han ska (å̶k̶a̶) ut!
    We must get him out of here!
    Jag tror han skulle (g̶å̶/å̶k̶a̶) hem
    I think he was going home
    Skulle du (f̶ö̶l̶j̶a̶) med eller?
    Were you going to join or what?
Usage notes[edit]
  • The construction in (sense 4) is commonly used with måste (must) as well, and can also be used with for example borde (should, ought to).
  • Infinitive and supine are rarely (if ever) used, and may be considered archaic. Skall is an older or more formal spelling for the present tense.
  • kommer att may also be used to denote a future action, but while it denotes something inevitable (something absolutely certain), ska refers to something which is required, intended, or a promise. Compare also bör, which is a (very) strong recommendation, but not without possibility to wiggle out of; and måste (must) which is used when there is a compelling need to do something:
    Solen kommer att gå upp i morgon bitti
    The Sun will rise tomorrow morning.
    Jag kommer att städa i morgon.
    I will clean up tomorrow (There's no doubt about that)
    Jag ska städa i morgon.
    I will (I promise to/I have been forced to promise to) clean up tomorrow.
    Jag måste städa i morgon.
    I have to clean up tomorrow [since there are guests coming]
    Jag bör städa i morgon.
    I should clean up tomorrow (It would be good if I did some cleaning up tomorrow)
Conjugation[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Zacatepec Chatino[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ska

  1. one