ile

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See also: Ile, ilé, ilɛ, île, %ile, and -ile

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English eile, eyle, eiȝle, from Old English eġl (an ail; awn; beard of barley; mote), from Proto-Germanic *agilō (awn). Cognate with German Egel, Achel.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile

  1. (obsolete) An ear of corn.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile (plural iles)

  1. Obsolete form of aisle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of H. Swinburne to this entry?)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile (plural iles)

  1. Obsolete form of isle.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 2”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      or spread his aerie flight / Upborn with indefatigable wings / Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive / The happy Ile

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile

  1. hair

Derived terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German īlen, from Proto-Germanic *īlijaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ile (imperative il, infinitive at ile, present tense iler, past tense ilede, perfect tense har ilet)

  1. hurry, hasten

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile f (plural iles)

  1. Alternative spelling of île

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Most likely from Ancient Greek εἰλεός (eileós, colic), from εἰλέω (eiléō, I throng, press), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to turn, wind, round), same source as with Old Armenian գելում (gelum).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

īle n (genitive īlis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) intestines, guts

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, “pure” i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative īle īlia
Genitive īlis īlium
Dative īlī īlibus
Accusative īle īlia
Ablative īlī īlibus
Vocative īle īlia

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • ile in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ile in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ile in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • ile in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ile in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German through Norwegian Bokmål.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ila (a infinitive)

Verb[edit]

ile (present tense iler, past tense ilte, past participle ilt, passive infinitive ilast, present participle ilande, imperative il)

  1. (intransitive) to hurry, haste, hasten

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps related to Middle Low German ilen or German eilen.

Noun[edit]

ile f (definite singular ila, indefinite plural iler, definite plural ilene)

  1. a spring, well

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse íli.

Noun[edit]

ile m (definite singular ilen, indefinite plural ilar, definite plural ilane)

  1. (fishing) This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ili (sole)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile m

  1. the sole of the foot

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ile

  1. how much, how many
    Ile to kosztuje?How much is it?
    Ile masz lat?How old are you? (literally, “How many years do you have?”)
  2. (colloquial) how long
    Ile jeszcze będę żył?How long will I still live?
    Ile trwa ciąża?How long does pregnancy last?

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ile m

  1. locative/vocative singular of

Further reading[edit]

  • ile in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ile in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ile

  1. Mi class inflected form of -le.
  2. N class inflected form of -le (singular only).

Turkish[edit]

Postposition[edit]

ile

  1. with
    Arkadaşımla dışarı çıkıyorum.I am going out with my friend.
    Müsadenizle.With your permission.

Conjunction[edit]

ile

  1. and (joining two noun phrases)
    Ateşle barut yan yana durmaz.Fire and gunpowder, side by side, do not last.

Usage notes[edit]

These usage notes apply equally to the use of ile as a postposition and as a conjunction.

The term can be used as a stand-alone word, but usually takes the form of an enclitic, that is, it is suffixed to the preceding word as -la / -yla or -le / -yle. Which form is used depends on the affixed word's dominant vowel, and whether the word ends in a vowel or a consonant.

An apostrophe is required when suffixed to a proper noun:

  • Şebnem'le
  • Ali'yle
  • Barış'la
  • Beyza'yla

Generally, the stress in a Turkish word goes to the last syllable, but, when used as an enclitic, (y)le / (y)la is unstressed and leaves the stress of the preceding word to which it is suffixed unchanged.

In a curious exception to vowel harmony, the suffix -yla raises a preceding back vowel ı to a front vowel i. For example, the word dolayısıyla (“consequently”, “therefore”) is pronounced /dolajɯˈsijla/.

The dual role of the term can occasionally result in an ambiguity. The saying bir taşla iki kuş vurmak, literally “to hit two birds with one stone”, can (theoretically) also mean “to hit one stone and two birds”.