grill

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grillen (to anger, provoke), from Old English grillan, griellan (to annoy, vex, offend), from Proto-Germanic *graljaną (to shout, make angry), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰer- (to rattle, make a noise, grumble). Cognate with Saterland Frisian grulje (to make angry), Dutch grillen (to shudder, shiver), Low German vergrellen (to anger, provoke), German grollen (to rumble) and perhaps also with French grouiller (to swarm).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

grill (third-person singular simple present grills, present participle grilling, simple past and past participle grilled)

  1. (transitive, Scotland, US) To make angry; provoke.
  2. (transitive, chiefly Scotland) To terrify; make tremble.
  3. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To tremble; shiver.
  4. (intransitive, Northern England, Scotland) To snarl; snap.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gril, grille (harsh, rough, severe), from Old English *griell, from Proto-Germanic *grellaz (angry), from Proto-Indo-European *gher- (to rattle, make a noise, grumble). Cognate with German grell (harsh, angry), Danish grel (shrill, glaring, dazzling).

Adjective[edit]

grill (comparative griller or more grill, superlative grillest or most grill)

  1. harsh, rough, severe; cruel

Noun[edit]

grill (usually uncountable, plural grills)

  1. harm

Etymology 3[edit]

1655, from French gril, from Middle French [Term?], from Old French greïl, graïl (gridiron), from graïlle (grate, grating), from Latin crātīcula (gridiron), diminutive of crātis (hurdle, wickerwork), q.v. Related to griddle, hurdle.

Alternative forms[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
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Noun[edit]

Brazier with grill and pot rest

grill (plural grills)

  1. A grating; a grid of wire or a sheet of material with a pattern of holes or slots, usually used to protect something while allowing the passage of air and liquids. Typical uses: to allow air through a fan while preventing fingers or objects from passing; to allow people to talk to somebody, while preventing attack.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      The house was a big elaborate limestone affair, evidently new. Winter sunshine sparkled on lace-hung casement, on glass marquise, and the burnished bronze foliations of grille and door.
  2. On a vehicle, a slotted cover as above, to protect and hide the radiator, while admitting air to cool it.
  3. (Britain) A cooking device comprising a source of radiative heat and a means of holding food under it; a broiler in US English
  4. (US) A cooking device comprising a source of radiative and convective heat and a means of holding food above it; a barbecue.
    I put some peppers and mushrooms on the grill to go with dinner.
  5. (colloquial) A type of jewelry worn on the front teeth.
  6. (colloquial, by extension) The front teeth regarded collectively.
  7. Food cooked on a grill.
    a packet of frozen cauliflower cheese grills
  8. A grillroom; a restaurant serving grilled food.
    These coupons will get you a discount at Johnny's Bar and Grill.
    • 1986, New York (volume 19, part 5, page 385)
      Everyone's meeting at the new grill in town! And everyone's having a real good time! They're drinking frozen blue Margaritas. Munching on Cajun popcorn shrimp. Laughing with old friends and getting to know new ones.
  9. (humorous) Misspelling of girl.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grill (third-person singular simple present grills, present participle grilling, simple past and past participle grilled)

  1. (transitive) To cook (food) on a grill; to barbecue.
    Why don't we get together Saturday and grill some burgers?
  2. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand, Britain) To cook food under the element of a stove or only under the top element of an oven(US) broil, (cooking) salamander.
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To interrogate; to question aggressively or harshly.
    The police grilled him about his movements at the time of the crime.
  4. (intransitive, informal) To feel very hot; to swelter.
  5. (transitive) To stamp or mark with a grill.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grill m (plural grills, diminutive grilletje n)

  1. grill

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French grille, gril, via English grill, grille

Noun[edit]

grill m (definite singular grillen, indefinite plural griller, definite plural grillene)

  1. (cooking) a grill
  2. (automotive) a radiator grille
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

grill

  1. imperative of grille

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From French grille, gril, via English grill, grille

Noun[edit]

grill m (definite singular grillen, indefinite plural grillar, definite plural grillane)

  1. (cooking) a grill
  2. (automotive) a radiator grille

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grill m inan

  1. barbecue (cooking device)
  2. barbecue (event with meal, typically held outdoors)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

grill m (plural grills)

  1. grill