grill

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grillen ‎(to anger, provoke), from Old English grillan, griellan ‎(to annoy, vex, offend), from Proto-Germanic *grellaną, *graljaną ‎(to shout, make angry), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰer- ‎(to rattle, make a noise, grumble). Cognate with Saterland Frisian grulje ‎(to make angry), Dutch grillen ‎(to shudder, shiver), Low German vergrellen ‎(to anger, provoke), German grollen ‎(to rumble) and perhaps also with French grouiller ‎(to swarm).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

grill ‎(third-person singular simple present grills, present participle grilling, simple past and past participle grilled)

  1. (transitive, Scotland, US) To make angry; provoke.
  2. (transitive, chiefly Scotland) To terrify; make tremble.
  3. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To tremble; shiver.
  4. (intransitive, Northern England, Scotland) To snarl; snap.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gril, grille ‎(harsh, rough, severe), from Old English *griell, from Proto-Germanic *grellaz ‎(angry), from Proto-Indo-European *gher- ‎(to rattle, make a noise, grumble). Cognate with German grell ‎(harsh, angry), Danish grel ‎(shrill, glaring, dazzling).

Adjective[edit]

grill ‎(comparative griller or more grill, superlative grillest or most grill)

  1. harsh, rough, severe; cruel

Noun[edit]

grill ‎(usually uncountable, plural grills)

  1. harm

Etymology 3[edit]

1655, from French gril, from Middle French, from Old French greïl, graïl ‎(gridiron), from graïlle ‎(grate, grating), from Latin crātīcula ‎(gridiron), diminutive of crātis ‎(hurdle, wickerwork), from Proto-Indo-European *kor(ə)t-, *krāt- ‎(to weave, twist, wattle; wicker). Related to griddle, hurdle.

Alternative forms[edit]

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Noun[edit]

Brazier with grill and pot rest

grill ‎(plural grills)

  1. A rack; a grid of wire or a sheet of material with a pattern of holes or slots, usually used to protect something while allowing the passage of air and liquids. Typical uses: to allow air through a fan while preventing fingers or objects from passing; to allow people to talk to somebody, while preventing attack.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, chapter I, The Younger Set:
      The house was a big elaborate limestone affair, evidently new. Winter sunshine sparkled on lace-hung casement, on glass marquise, and the burnished bronze foliations of grille and door.
  2. On a vehicle, a slotted cover as above, to protect and hide the radiator, while admitting air to cool it.
  3. A device comprising a source of radiant heat and a means of holding food near it, to cook it; a barbecue; a griddle.
    I put some peppers and mushrooms on the grill to go with dinner.
  4. (colloquial) A type of jewelry worn on the front teeth.
  5. (colloquial, by extension) The front teeth regarded collectively.
  6. Food cooked on a grill.
    a packet of frozen cauliflower cheese grills
  7. A grillroom; a restaurant serving grilled food.
    These coupons will get you a discount at Johnny's Bar and Grill.
    • 1986, New York (volume 19, part 5, page 385)
      Everyone's meeting at the new grill in town! And everyone's having a real good time! They're drinking frozen blue Margaritas. Munching on Cajun popcorn shrimp. Laughing with old friends and getting to know new ones.
  8. (humorous) Misspelling of girl.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grill ‎(third-person singular simple present grills, present participle grilling, simple past and past participle grilled)

  1. (transitive) To cook (food) on a grill; to barbecue.
    Why don't we get together Saturday and grill some burgers?
  2. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand, Britain) To cook food under the element of a stove or only under the top element of an oven(US) broil, (cooking) salamander.
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To interrogate; to question aggressively or harshly.
    The police grilled him about his movements at the time of the crime.
  4. (intransitive, informal) To feel very hot; to swelter.
  5. (transitive) To stamp or mark with a grill.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grill m ‎(plural grills, diminutive grilletje n)

  1. grill

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French grille, gril, via English grill, grille

Noun[edit]

grill m ‎(definite singular grillen, indefinite plural griller, definite plural grillene)

  1. (cooking) a grill
  2. (automotive) a radiator grille
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

grill

  1. imperative of grille

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From French grille, gril, via English grill, grille

Noun[edit]

grill m ‎(definite singular grillen, indefinite plural grillar, definite plural grillane)

  1. (cooking) a grill
  2. (automotive) a radiator grille

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grill m inan

  1. barbecue (cooking device)
  2. barbecue (event with meal, typically held outdoors)

Declension[edit]