broil

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English broillen, brulen (to broil, cook), from Anglo-Norman bruiller, broiller (to broil, roast), Old French brusler, bruller (to broil, roast, char), a blend of two Old French verbs:

Verb[edit]

broil (third-person singular simple present broils, present participle broiling, simple past and past participle broiled)

  1. (transitive, Canada, US) To cook by direct, radiant heat.
    Synonym: grill (British)
  2. (transitive, Canada, US) To expose to great heat.
  3. (intransitive, Canada, US) To be exposed to great heat.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

broil (plural broils)

  1. Food prepared by broiling.
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard:
      Cluffe, externally acquiescing, had yet made up his mind, if a decent opportunity presented, to be detected and made prisoner, and that the honest troubadours should sup on a hot broil, and sip some of the absent general's curious Madeira at the feet of their respective mistresses, with all the advantage which a situation so romantic and so private would offer.

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English broilen (to quarrel, present in disorder), from Anglo-Norman broiller (to mix up), from Vulgar Latin *brodiculāre (to jumble together) from *brodum (broth, stew), from Frankish *broþ (broth), from Proto-Germanic *bruþą (broth). Doublet of broth.

Verb[edit]

broil (third-person singular simple present broils, present participle broiling, simple past and past participle broiled)

  1. (transitive) To cause a rowdy disturbance; embroil.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To brawl.

Noun[edit]

broil (plural broils)

  1. (archaic) A brawl; a rowdy disturbance.
    come to broils
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act I, verses 1-2
      So, I am safe emerged from these broils! / Amid the wreck of thousands I am whole
    • 1820, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe, Chapter 27
      "Away with this prating dotard," said Front-de Boeuf, "lock him up in the chapel, to tell his beads till the broil be over. It will be a new thing to the saints in Torquilstone to hear aves and paters; they have not been so honoured, I trow, since they were cut out of stone."
    • 1840, Robert Chambers, ‎William Chambers, Chambers's Edinburgh Journal (volume 8, page 382)
      Since the provinces declared their independence, broils and squabblings of one sort and another have greatly retarded the advancement which they might otherwise have made.
    • 1756, Edmund Burke, A Vindication of Natural Society
      I will own that there is a haughtiness and fierceness in human nature which will cause innumerable broils, place men in what situation you please.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]