złoty

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: zloty, Zloty, and zlotý

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

złoty (plural złotys)

  1. Alternative form of zloty
    • 1945, Bernadotte E[verly] Schmitt, editor, Poland, Berkeley, Calif.; Los Angeles, Calif.: University of California Press, pages 228–229:
      A special working fund administered by the State Agricultural Bank was established to meet all expenses connected with the measures necessary for improving the agrarian structure of the country. In the beginning it amounted to 900,000,000 złotys. After a cancellation of part of its obligations due on small farms, the balance by December 31, 1938, was more than 667,000,000 złotys.
    • 1973, D. Lasok, editor, Polish Civil Law, volume I, Leiden: A.W. Sijthoff, →ISBN, page 270:
      Accordingly, if the estate is worth 90,000 złotys and the deceased leaves a widow A, and two children B and C, and B has already received 60,000 złotys, the calculation is as follows:- the value of a notional estate equals 150,000 złotys (90,000 + 60,000) and each share amounts to 50,000 złotys.
    • 2005, Peter Black, “The Sonderdienst”, in Pieter M. Judson and Marsha L. Rozenblit, editors, Constructing Nationalities in East Central Europe (Austrian and Habsburg Studies; volume 6), New York, N.Y.; Oxford: Berghahn Books, →ISBN, page 250:
      Once in the field, the Sonderdienstmann received 90 złotys per month with a supplement of 11 złotys per month when on active duty outside the normal duty station. By the summer of 1941, Sonderdienst men were receiving benefits, including free housing and uniforms as well as an untaxed food allowance of 2.70 złotys per day.
    • 2012, Richard Butterwick, The Polish Revolution and the Catholic Church, 1788–1792: A Political History, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 92:
      At one extreme, Symeon Szydłowski, the castellan of Żarnów, suggested exempting parish priests with less than 3,000 złotys from the new tax. At the other, Suchodolski protested that poor nobles with families on 500 złotys a year would also find defenders.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *zoltъ (golden), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃-. Cognate with Upper Sorbian złoty, Polish złoty, Czech zlatý, Serbo-Croatian zlátan, and Russian золото́й (zolotój).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

złoty

  1. gold, golden

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From złoto (gold) +‎ -y, from Proto-Slavic *zolto, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine), whence English golden and gilded. For the currency compare German Gulden and Danish øre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈzwɔ.tɨ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔtɨ
  • Syllabification: zło‧ty

Adjective[edit]

złoty (not comparable)

  1. golden (made of, or relating to, gold)
    Synonym: złocisty
  2. gold, golden (having a colour or other richness suggestive of gold)
    Synonym: złocisty

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective
noun

Related terms[edit]

adjective
noun

Noun[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

złoty m anim

  1. zloty (currency of Poland)
  2. (heraldry) or

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: zloty
  • Yiddish: זלאָטע(zlote)

Further reading[edit]

  • złoty in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • złoty in Polish dictionaries at PWN