gelt

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: gèlt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡɛlt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Irish geilt.

Noun[edit]

gelt (plural gelts)

  1. (rare) A lunatic.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.7:
      She [] like a ghastly Gelt whose wits are reaved, / Ran forth in hast with hideous outcry []

Etymology 2[edit]

Variation of gilt.

Noun[edit]

gelt (plural gelts)

  1. (obsolete) Gilding; gilt.

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

gelt

  1. simple past tense and past participle of geld

Noun[edit]

gelt (plural gelts)

  1. A gelding.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle High German gelt (modern German Geld), from Old High German gelt (payment, money), from Proto-Germanic *geldą (reward, gift, money). Later reinforced by Yiddish געלט(gelt). Doublet of native words geld and yield.

Noun[edit]

gelt (usually uncountable, plural gelts)

  1. (slang) Money.
    • 1948, William Burroughs, letter, 5 Jun 1948:
      Have bought some farm land in Rio Grande Valley which should bring in a sizeable bundle of gelts come cotton picking time.
    • 1969, Robert L. Vann, The Competitor (volumes 2-3, page 135)
      The miser, a-seeking lost gelt, / The doughboy, awaiting the battle, / May possibly know how I felt / While the long years dragged by as the dealer / As slow as the slowest of dubs, / Stuck out the last helping of tickets / 'Till I lifted—the Bullet of Clubs!
  2. Tribute; tax.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The History of Waltham Abbey
      All these the king granted unto them [] free from all gelts [guilds] and payments, in a most full and ample manner.

Etymology 5[edit]

From Yiddish געלט(gelt). See above for more.

Noun[edit]

gelt (usually uncountable, plural gelts)

  1. (Judaism) Money, especially that given as a gift on Hanukkah or used in games of dreidel.
  2. (Judaism) Chocolate candy in the shape of coins, usually wrapped in metallic foil, usually eaten on Hanukkah and often used for games of dreidel.
  3. (archaic, Britain, thieves' cant and Polari) Money.
Derived terms[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from gelta (to bark).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gelt n (genitive singular gelts, no plural)

  1. barking
    Synonyms: gjamm,

Declension[edit]