jung

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See also: Jung

Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

Adjective[edit]

jung

  1. (Carcoforo) young

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós. Compare Dutch jong, English young, Danish ung.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jung (comparative jünger, superlative am jüngsten)

  1. young

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • jung in Duden online

Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós. Compare German jung, Dutch jong, English young, Danish ung.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jung (comparative jünger, superlative jüngst)

  1. young

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jung

  1. (chiefly early) Alternative form of yong

References[edit]


Mòcheno[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

Adjective[edit]

jung

  1. young

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

Adjective[edit]

jung

  1. young

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 208. →ISBN

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jungaz, contracted form of an earlier *juwungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *yuwn̥kós from *h₂yuh₁en-. Cognate with Old Frisian jung, Old English ġeong, Dutch jong, Middle High German junc (German jung), Old Norse ungr (Swedish ung), Gothic 𐌾𐌿𐌲𐌲𐍃 (juggs); and with Latin iuvencus (young bull), Old Irish oac (young), Russian юный (junyj, youthful).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jung (comparative jungoro, superlative jungost)

  1. young

Declension[edit]




Descendants[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, contracted form of an earlier *juwungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *yuwn̥kós from *h₂yuh₁en-. Cognate with Old Frisian jung, Old English ġeong, Dutch jong, Old High German jung (German jung), Old Norse ungr (Swedish ung), Gothic 𐌾𐌿𐌲𐌲𐍃 (juggs); and with Latin iuvencus (young bull), Old Irish oac (young), Russian юный (junyj, youthful).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jung

  1. young

Antonyms[edit]