loude

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English loude, lude, from Old English hlȳd (noise, sound, tumult, disturbance, dissension), from Proto-Germanic *hlūdijō (sound), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewe- (to hear). Cognate with Scots lood, luid (sound, noise, tone, voice), West Frisian lûd (sound, voice, vote, say), Dutch geluid (sound), German Laut (sound), Swedish ljud (sound), Icelandic hljóð (sound).

Noun[edit]

loude (plural loudes)

  1. (obsolete) Sound.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hlūd, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewtos.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

loude (inflected form loude, comparative loudere)

  1. Making a lot of noise or tending to do so; loud.
  2. (rare) Hearable; detectable by one's listening.
  3. (rare) Obvious, easily detectable or discoverable.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English hlūde, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdǭ.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

loude (comparative louder)

  1. In a way that makes a lot of noise; loudly.
  2. (rare) Hearably; in a way that is detectable by one's listening.
  3. (rare) Obviously, in a way that is easily detectable or discoverable.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From a conflation of Old English hlȳd (from Proto-Germanic *hlūdijō) and Old Norse hljóð (from Proto-Germanic *hleuþą).

Noun[edit]

loude

  1. Alternative form of lude