clod

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English clod, a late by-form of clot, from Proto-West Germanic *klott (mass, ball, clump). Compare clot and cloud; cognate to Dutch klodde (rag) and kloot (clod).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clod (plural clods)

  1. A lump of something, especially of earth or clay.
  2. The ground; the earth; a spot of earth or turf.
  3. A stupid person; a dolt.
  4. Part of a shoulder of beef, or of the neck piece near the shoulder.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

clod (third-person singular simple present clods, present participle clodding, simple past and past participle clodded)

  1. (transitive) To pelt with clods.
    • 1906, Mark Twain,Eve's Diary"
      "When I went there yesterday evening in the gloaming it had crept down and was trying to catch the little speckled fishes that play in the pool, and I had to clod it to make it go up the tree again and let them alone."
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jonson to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, Scotland) To throw violently; to hurl.
  3. To collect into clods, or into a thick mass; to coagulate; to clot.

References[edit]

clod in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A late by-form of clot of unclear provenance. Compare Old English *clod, a form of clot found in compounds and placenames.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clod (plural cloddes)

  1. A clod; a ball of earth or clay.
  2. (rare) A clot or clump of blood.
  3. (rare) A shoulder of beef.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: clod
  • Scots: clod

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *klutom (rumour; fame), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- (heard, famous) (whence also clywed (to hear)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clod m (plural clodydd)

  1. praise, renown, credit
  2. distinction (in exam results)

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
clod glod nghlod chlod
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “clod”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies