dank

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See also: Dank and -dank

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English danke (wet, damp; dampness, moisture), probably from North Germanic, related to Swedish dank (marshy spot), Icelandic dökk (pool), Old Norse dǫkk (pit, depression), from Proto-Germanic *dankwaz (dark). However, some trace it to a West Germanic source such as Dutch damp (vapor) or Middle High German damph, both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *dampaz (smoke, steam, vapor)[1][2][3].

Adjective[edit]

dank (comparative danker, superlative dankest)

  1. Dark, damp and humid.
    The dank cave was chilly and spooky.
  2. (figurative, of marijuana) Highly potent.
    That was dank bud.
  3. (slang, often ironic) Great, awesome.
    • 2020 January 5, Rick Wilson, “Bannon Banished for Telling Truths About Trump as MAGA Monsters Turn on Each Other”, in The Daily Beast[1]:
      His house organ Breitbart and a host of Trump-right websites and news outlets sang praises to his dank genius.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

dank (plural danks)


  1. Moisture; humidity; water.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book VII, verse 441:
    "Yet oft they quit | The dank, and rising on siff pennons, tow'r | the mid aerial sky"

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English danken, from the adjective (see above).

Verb[edit]

dank (third-person singular simple present danks, present participle danking, simple past and past participle danked)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To moisten, dampen; used of mist, dew etc.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  2. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 669
  3. ^ dank” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Etymology 3[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dank (plural danks)

  1. A small silver coin formerly used in Persia.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch danc, from Old Dutch *thank, from Proto-Germanic *þankaz.

Noun[edit]

dank m (uncountable)

  1. gratitude, thanks
  2. show/token of recognition
  3. reward, recompense
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

dank

  1. first-person singular present indicative of danken
  2. imperative of danken

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with danken and Dutch dank; compare the Latin grātia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

dank (+ genitive or dative)

  1. thanks to, because of
    Dank seiner Arbeit hat er genug Geld zum Leben.
    Thanks to his work he has enough money to live.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dank in Duden online

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dank m

  1. tax, fine, levy, duty

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dank in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dank

  1. second-person singular imperative of danken