damp

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English *damp (inferred from the verb). Akin to Low German damp, Dutch damp, and Danish damp ‎(vapor, steam, fog), German Dampf, Icelandic dampi, Swedish damm ‎(dust), and to German dampf imperative of dimpfen ‎(to smoke). Also Middle English dampen ‎(to extinguish, choke, suffocate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

damp ‎(comparative damper, superlative dampest)

  1. Being in a state between dry and wet; moderately wet; moist.
    • O'erspread with a damp sweat and holy fear - John Dryden
    The lawn was still damp so we decided not to sit down.
    The paint is still damp, so please don't touch it.
  2. (figuratively) despondent; dispirited, downcast
  3. (obsolete) Pertaining to or affected by noxious vapours; dejected, stupified.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 1, ll. 522-3:
      All these and more came flocking; but with looks / Down cast and damp.

Usage notes[edit]

Damp is mainly used for disagreeable conditions while moist is mostly used for agreeable conditions:

  • damp clothes
  • moist cake

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

damp ‎(countable and uncountable, plural damps)

  1. Moisture; humidity; dampness.
  2. (archaic) Fog; fogginess; vapor.
    • Milton
      Night [] with black air / Accompanied, with damps and dreadful gloom.
  3. (archaic) Dejection or depression.
    • Joseph Addison
      Even now, while thus I stand blest in thy presence, / A secret damp of grief comes o'er my soul.
    • J. D. Forbes
      It must have thrown a damp over your autumn excursion.
  4. (archaic or historical, mining) A gaseous product, formed in coal mines, old wells, pits, etc.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

damp ‎(third-person singular simple present damps, present participle damping, simple past and past participle damped)


  1. (transitive, archaic) To dampen; to render damp; to moisten; to make humid, or moderately wet; as, to damp cloth.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To put out, as fire; to depress or deject; to deaden; to cloud; to check or restrain, as action or vigor; to make dull; to weaken; to discourage.
  3. (transitive) To suppress vibrations (mechanical) or oscillations (electrical) by converting energy to heat (or some other form of energy).
    • To damp your tender hopes - Mark Akenside
    • Usury dulls and damps all industries, improvements, and new inventions, wherein money would be stirring if it were not for this slug - Francis Bacon
    • How many a day has been damped and darkened by an angry word! - Sir John Lubbock
    • The failure of his enterprise damped the spirit of the soldiers. - Thomas Babington Macaulay
    • Hollow rollers damp vibration. - [1]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Noun[edit]

damp c (singular definite dampen, plural indefinite dampe)

  1. steam

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

damp

  1. imperative of dampe

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

damp m ‎(plural dampen, diminutive dampje n)

  1. vapour (UK), vapor (US)

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

damp

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dampen
  2. imperative of dampen

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German damp

Noun[edit]

damp m ‎(definite singular dampen, indefinite plural damper, definite plural dampene)

  1. steam
  2. vapour (UK), vapor (US)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German damp

Noun[edit]

damp m ‎(definite singular dampen, indefinite plural dampar, definite plural dampane)

  1. steam
  2. vapour (UK), vapor (US)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

damp

  1. past tense of dimpa.